Question 28. In providing for a range of employment space, are there particular locations we should be focusing on? Are there specific locations important for different types of business or industry?

Showing forms 91 to 108 of 108
Form ID: 50822
Respondent: Pigeon Land 2 Ltd
Agent: Savills

Pigeon consider that the Local Plan should provide a balanced approach to the location of new employment development which both builds on existing strengths and takes advantages of the new opportunities created by the new settlements. The Local Plan should therefore seek to allocate a range of sizes and types of sites both close to existing clusters and at community level. This should include sites in proximity to existing hi-tech employment clusters such as the Science Park and the Biomedical Campus along with new and expansion of existing industrial estates. More community scaled facilities for start-ups and incubators should also be encouraged within new or expanding housing areas and employment areas as part of new or expanding settlements within strategic transport corridors. We would encourage further employment land allocations at Cambourne as part of such an approach. Policies should be flexible enough to allow for a range of business uses and to allow for the dynamic nature of businesses.

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Form ID: 50921
Respondent: The Landowners
Agent: Miss Simone Skinner

4.40 Different business sectors require different needs and locations. It is important that this is recognised in the GCLP. A variety of premises should be permitted in different locations and the emphasis should not be solely on new settlements or the edge of Cambridge. 4.41 We are pleased that the GCLP acknowledges that there is a range of businesses located at South Cambridgeshire villages, in both small premises and business parks or industrial estates. It is essential that further employment is provided in sustainable locations and adjoining existing residential areas to reduce the pull of the city centre and the edge of the city. This would support healthy lifestyles and reduce the need to travel, and support the councils’ net zero carbon aspirations.

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Form ID: 50973
Respondent: The Landowners
Agent: Miss Simone Skinner

4.39 Different business sectors require different needs and locations. It is important that this is recognised in the GCLP. A variety of premises should be permitted in different locations and the emphasis should not be solely on new settlements or the edge of Cambridge. 4.40 We are pleased that the GCLP acknowledges that there is a range of businesses located at South Cambridgeshire villages, in both small premises and business parks or industrial estates. It is essential that further employment is provided in sustainable locations and adjoining existing residential areas to reduce the pull of the city centre and the edge of the city. This would support healthy lifestyles and reduce the need to travel, and support the councils’ net zero carbon aspirations.

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Form ID: 51002
Respondent: SmithsonHill
Agent: Terence O'Rourke

Different areas of Greater Cambridge are appropriate for different types of businesses. The AgriTech sector needs a site which: o Is within one of the most dynamic and successful areas of the UK, which is home to world-leading clusters which influence and shape the innovation economy and contain some of the highest levels of entrepreneurship in the UK. • Is within the very successful Greater Cambridge Southern Cluster with opportunities for linkages and innovation between the life science and AgriTech sectors • Is dedicated to the needs of AgriTech located next to accessible agricultural land for fields trials and demonstration projects. • has excellent transport links into Cambridge but also to London and a number of international airports via both road and rail • is strategically located within London-Stansted-Cambridge-Corridor, the Cambridge to Oxford Arc and the Norwich Tech Corridor • is large enough and available now to provide all required facilities to meet the bespoke needs of AgriTech occupiers on one site An extensive review has been carried out of the availability of sites to meet the criteria required to provide a successful park of this type, meeting the needs of the AgriTech sector. It is clear that land at Hinxton can deliver on all these requirements and that there are no other sites which would meet these needs and support the AgriTech sector in a way that would allow it to thrive and produce the nationally significant benefits that a development of this type would provide.

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Form ID: 51133
Respondent: North Newnham Residents Association

It would benefit the area as a whole if employment space and related jobs were more dispersed rather than seeking to focus on Cambridge itself where the existing infrastructure organised around a medieval city struggles to cope. This would spread the economic benefits of good employment opportunities to the wider area, rather than focussing such development in the City of Cambridge and its immediate surroundings. With the volume of new housing in Cambourne Northstowe and Waterbeach etc., more employment space and work opportunities should be provided in the neighbourhood of such developments and any other new settlements in the interests of sustainability and reducing carbon footprint etc., where it is easier for new adequate infrastructure to be created. Summary of Comments: We believe that it is of great improtance to try and co-locate employemnt and new housing developments in new settlements.

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Form ID: 51162
Respondent: First Base
Agent: Bidwells

5.12 The UK industrial Strategy advocates focusing on our strengths, “fostering clusters and connectivity across cities, towns and surrounding areas” * Sites which support these clusters are necessary and could be urban, edge of town or rural. 5.13 Locations with high levels of public transport access should be identified for businesses with high employment densities. This would include sites within walking distance of train stations, travel hubs and along transport corridors. “by ensuring good quality public transport is in place before development, the number of those new residents who will use the transport is maximised. This is also likely to be the best way to stretch some of the high-value businesses based within and around Cambridge out into wider Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. These companies will not want to be distant from the city, but these clusters could ‘grow’ out along the transportation links, providing connection to other market towns.” ** 5.14 Taller prime office buildings could locate at Cambridge’s railway stations to focus development at transport hubs; keeping the city compact, but supporting the demand for high quality office space, particularly that arising from knowledge intensive (KI), especially artificial intelligence firms around Cambridge Central station. This supports CPIERs third key recommendation: “Ensuring that Cambridge continues to deliver for KI businesses should be considered a nationally strategic priority”. 5.15 The cluster effect is well-evidenced in Cambridgeshire and an opportunity exists for Greater Cambridge to encourage the forces of agglomeration through promotion of sites around existing groups of same-sector companies. This is certainly the case for the Science and Technology Sector. A spatial strategy to provide for a range of commercial and job opportunities should be informed by the cluster approach, but not at the expense of unduly restricting employment opportunities across the Plan area, particularly to transport corridors. 5.16 Non-knowledge intensive companies tend to be more footloose and typically locate where premises are provided rather than through bespoke development, while some companies expand from humbler often rural beginnings in converted buildings. To enable this growth dynamic, employment locations in settlements of all sizes and classification should be allocated or be permissible, with larger concentrations of floorspace in areas with better public transport and access to active modes of travel. CPIER supports this position noting that deeper networks on smaller clusters on the periphery of Cambridge could help spread the ‘Cambridge effect’. *UK Industrial Strategy 2017 p18 **CPIER p41

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Form ID: 51301
Respondent: Varrier-Jones Foundation
Agent: Bidwells

5.12 The UK industrial Strategy advocates focusing on our strengths, “fostering clusters and connectivity across cities, towns and surrounding areas” 3 Sites which support these clusters are necessary and could be urban, edge of town or rural. 5.13 Locations with high levels of public transport access should be identified for businesses with high employment densities. This would include sites within walking distance of train stations, travel hubs and along transport corridors. “by ensuring good quality public transport is in place before development, the number of those new residents who will use the transport is maximised. This is also likely to be the best way to stretch some of the high-value businesses based within and around Cambridge out into wider Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. These companies will not want to be distant from the city, but these clusters could ‘grow’ out along the transportation links, providing connection to other market towns.” 4 2 CPIER p54 3 UK Industrial Strategy 2017 p18 4 CPIER p41 Page 21 5.14 Non-knowledge intensive companies tend to be more footloose and typically locate where premises are provided rather than through bespoke development, while some companies expand from humbler often rural beginnings in converted buildings. To enable this growth dynamic, employment locations in settlements of all sizes and classification should be allocated or be permissible, with larger concentrations of floorspace in areas with better public transport and access to active modes of travel. CPIER supports this position noting that deeper networks on smaller clusters on the periphery of Cambridge could help spread the ‘Cambridge effect’. 5.15 By expanding the existing site allocation under Policy E/5 to increase the size of Papworth Business Park. Papworth Business Park is allocated in the current Local Plan under site allocation Policy E/5. The business park should be expanded to include land to the east of the business park to build on the success of the existing Park and cater for increased tenant demand.

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Form ID: 51391
Respondent: - C/O Agent
Agent: Lichfields

Forecasts suggest that long-term Greater Cambridge could see job growth of up to around 3,500 per year under a transformational job scenario, with associated housing need for around 2,200-2,300 homes per year across Greater Cambridge. There is good reason for Greater Cambridge to consider delivery in excess of its standard method figure (of c.1,800 homes per year). This would be consistent with the NIC’s findings that housebuilding across the CaMKOx arc would need to roughly double compared with recent delivery levels to meet needs in full, including those from land constrained markets. It would also assist the area in meeting more of its affordable housing needs and deal with some of the pressure from unmet housing needs in London leading to in commuters from the capital, often with greater purchasing power than local residents. The edge of the city is likely to need to be the focus for future employment growth. To achieve the most sustainable commuting patterns, housing similarly needs to be located on the edge of the city. We know that the most common method of transport for those living in the city and fringe who also work there is by cycling or walking. These high levels of sustainable travel can be maintained with the co-location of housing and employment at the site, and potentially the number using cars to travel locally could be reduced if accessibility around the local area is improved as a result of the development.

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Form ID: 51439
Respondent: Axis Land Partnerships
Agent: Bidwells

4.43 The UK industrial Strategy advocates focusing on our strengths, “fostering clusters and connectivity across cities, towns and surrounding areas”. Sites which support these clusters are necessary and could be urban, edge of town or rural. 4.44 The new Local Plan should support a range of businesses located at South Cambridgeshire villages, in both small premises and business parks or industrial estates. These complement the employers based in or on the edge of Cambridge, or the large business parks in South Cambridgeshire. 4.45 The new Local Plan should allow for new business space, or flexible co-working space, in neighbourhoods or villages to help reduce the need to travel and support the net zero carbon aspirations. 4.46 Locations with high levels of public transport access should be identified for business uses. This would include sites within walking distance of train stations, travel hubs and along transport corridors. “by ensuring good quality public transport is in place before development, the number of those new residents who will use the transport is maximised. This is also likely to be the best way to stretch some of the high-value businesses based within and around Cambridge out into wider Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. These companies will not want to be distant from the city, but these clusters could ‘grow’ out along the transportation links, providing connection to other market towns.” CPIER p41 4.47 To enable growth of non-knowledge intensive companies, employment locations in settlements of all sizes and classification should be allocated or be permissible, with larger concentrations of Page 21 floorspace in areas with better public transport and access to active modes of travel. CPIER supports this position noting that deeper networks on smaller clusters on the periphery of Cambridge could help spread the ‘Cambridge effect’. 4.48 Furthermore, all new employment space should be located and built to maximise the health and wellbeing of employees and visitors. Healthy buildings in locations that reduce commute times and improve the sleep and wellbeing of its occupants contribute significantly to their productivity. Improving productivity is a primary route through which the Greater Cambridgeshire economic expansion objectives of doubling GVA and inclusive growth will be achieved. “If workers can be more productive, they can bring home more take home pay, which will flow into the local economy. And they will be able to enjoy a higher standard of life. It is this, before anything else, which needs to be looked at to create an inclusive economic future.” CPIER p38 4.49 The new Local Plan should therefore seek to allocate new employment land to provide flexible workspace, local employment closer to home, provide diversity of rural jobs and alleviate pressure to commute into the current employment hotspots. 4.50 A new settlement at Station Fields has the ability to provide new local employment opportunities, but not only provide access to local jobs, but also to jobs within the city of Cambridge, Science Parks and Biomedical clusters. 4.51 Station Fields is also well-located to expand the cluster of businesses that prefer to co-locate with the IT, AI, biotech business at Cambridge Science Park and biomedical campus both of which would be easily accessible by train. It could play a dual role also as an untried and therefore relatively cheap location for businesses who don’t need to be in the established cluster zone.

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Form ID: 51595
Respondent: Cambridgeshire County Council

WITH REFERENCE TO 4.5.3 The provision of high quality education supports economic development by providing the individual with the necessary skills to take advantage of the employment opportunities available. Equally, providing the right opportunities in terms of employment can also help to meet local needs, as well as provide opportunities for valuable and varied employment from further people travelling/relocating from further afield.A balance of the two key elements above is essential in achieving great places to live, work and learn.

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Form ID: 51698
Respondent: U+I Group PLC
Agent: Carter Jonas

2.48 See response to Q.25.

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Form ID: 56197
Respondent: Ms Cathy Parker

· Businesses and industrial spaces need to be connected to the high-quality cycling network, as well as public transport, in order to ensure that people have the opportunity to get to work without driving. · New developments should always include some space for adaptable businesses and light industrial uses, in order to provide employment in the community that is easily accessed on foot or bike, and a healthy mix of activities in new developments. · The Local Plan must not allow car-dependent 'dormitory estates' where everyone is forced to travel long distances to access everyday activities like jobs, schools, surgeries and shopping. · Absolutely no employment site should be developed or expanded in any location before sustainable transport links have been established. Cycling, bus and train links must be there before a single employee starts work and forms the habit of driving a car to work.

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Form ID: 56232
Respondent: CEG
Agent: CEG

Please see section 6.0 and 7.0 of the accompanying representations document. Forecasts suggest that long-term Greater Cambridge could see job growth of up to around 3,500 per year under a transformational job scenario, with associated housing need for around 2,200-2,300 homes per year across Greater Cambridge. There is good reason for Greater Cambridge to consider delivery in excess of its standard method figure (of c.1,800 homes per year). This would be consistent with the NIC’s findings that housebuilding across the CaMKOx arc would need to roughly double compared with recent delivery levels to meet needs in full, including those from land constrained markets. It would also assist the area in meeting more of its affordable housing needs and deal with some of the pressure from unmet housing needs in London leading to in commuters from the capital, often with greater purchasing power than local residents. The edge of the city is likely to need to be the focus for future employment growth. To achieve the most sustainable commuting patterns, housing similarly needs to be located on the edge of the city. We know that the most common method of transport for those living in the city and fringe who also work there is by cycling or walking. These high levels of sustainable travel can be maintained with the co-location of housing and employment at the site, and potentially the number using cars to travel locally could be reduced if accessibility around the local area is improved as a result of the development.

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Form ID: 56268
Respondent: Bidwells
Agent: Bidwells

Locations with high levels of public transport access should be identified for businesses with high employment densities. This would include sites within walking distance of train stations, travel hubs and along transport corridors. “by ensuring good quality public transport is in place before development, the number of those new residents who will use the transport is maximised. This is also likely to be the best way to stretch some of the high-value businesses based within and around Cambridge out into wider Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. These companies will not want to be distant from the city, but these clusters could ‘grow’ out along the transportation links, providing connection to other market towns.” 2 The new community proposed at the Six Mile Bottom Estate would provide for jobs and homes significantly reducing the need for car journeys. The proposal is for a balanced job ratio of 2 CPIER p41 Greater Cambridge Consultation Document - Six Mile Bottom Page 20 approximately one job per household, this level of internalisation of job creation will significantly aid to achieving zero carbon. The Vision capitalises on: ● The Site's locational advantage in respect of Cambridge’s established high tech business locations and its associated supply chain, as well as The Fens micro and agritech businesses; ● Its emphasis on delivering fast and convenient public transit / mobility through rail, road and CAM; ● The compact and critical mass of its resident population creating a Natural Capital approach to capturing the growing home-work / flexible workplace opportunities, and; ● An ability to deliver a zero carbon living and working environment in part through significant on-site renewables. We anticipate these unique qualities will support significant job growth and new employment facilities at Six Mile Bottom for: ● The high tech sector; ● Establishing an Agri/Equine Tech ‘launchpad’; ● Create significant advance of home-work hubs; ● Co-working and flexible working centres; as well as, ● Providing strategic space for supply chain and emerging technologies that would benefit from the locational benefits. Whilst this approach to jobs is specific to the established and emerging work sectors, it importantly creates the conditions for new businesses, start ups and grown on space to succeed, and critically provides the mobility, energy and community infrastructure to deliver a zero carbon living and working community

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Form ID: 56283
Respondent: DB Group
Agent: Carter Jonas

The Local Plan needs to ensure that there is enough industrial space to accommodate B2, General Industrial use, on sites that will not be hampered by surrounding land uses. DB Group operate in Bourn and their site is in close proximity to the Bourn Airfield New Village. The following operations and processes are undertaken on site: - Sand grading – filtering sand to provide different levels of fineness; - Production of additives used in concrete mixes – blending of powders from silo storage; -Warehousing – receipt and dispatch of goods either manufactured or purchased off site for resale. The blending and grading processes undertaken on site generates external noise, particularly in respect of the extraction system used to capture and recycle dust particles from the manufacturing processes to maintain air quality. The site is also serviced by an average of 2 incoming and 3 outgoing HGV movements a day. The company currently employs 21 full time staff on site with a further 40 being primarily field based and visiting the site approximately once a week. DB Group are currently exploring a number of expansion opportunities. One of these is a volumetric truck operator to supply concrete directly to customers. Activity at their existing site at Bourn associated with this operation would be external and would entail filling the various hoppers on the vehicle. This would require at least one further silo on site and the use of a mechanical loader to take aggregates and sand from external storage bays. These operations have the potential to increase the level of noise generated at the site and would also increase HGV movements. A further opportunity exists in the production, cutting and finishing of precast concrete products. This would require concrete mixing equipment, supplied from bagged and/ or additional bulk silo stocks, as well as the use of stone-cutting saws. In light of the above, it is essential that the proposed Bourn Airfield New Village takes full account of DB Group’s existing operations and will not hamper future expansion plans. This will require particular consideration being given to adequate distance separation from noise sources, site and building layout / orientation, provision of acoustic barriers as deemed necessary as a result of detailed assessments, particularly with regard to noise and air quality. This accords with the Planning Practice Guidance (PPG) which states: “How can the risk of conflict between new development and existing businesses or facilities be addressed? Development proposed in the vicinity of existing businesses, community facilities or other activities may need to put suitable mitigation measures in place to avoid those activities having a significant adverse effect on residents or users of the proposed scheme. In these circumstances the applicant (or ‘agent of change’) will need to clearly identify the effects of existing businesses that may cause a nuisance (including noise, but also dust, odours, vibration and other sources of pollution) and the likelihood that they could have a significant adverse effect on new residents/users. In doing so, the agent of change will need to take into account not only the current activities that may cause a nuisance, but also those activities that businesses or other facilities are permitted to carry out, even if they are not occurring at the time of the application being made. The agent of change will also need to define clearly the mitigation being proposed to address any potential significant adverse effects that are identified. Adopting this approach may not prevent all complaints from the new residents/users about noise or other effects, but can help to achieve a satisfactory living or working environment, and help to mitigate the risk of a statutory nuisance being found if the new development is used as designed (for example, keeping windows closed and using alternative ventilation systems when the noise or other effects are occurring).” Paragraph: 009 Reference ID: 30-009-20190722 Revision date: 22 07 2019

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Form ID: 56332
Respondent: First Base
Agent: Bidwells

5.12 The UK industrial Strategy advocates focusing on our strengths, “fostering clusters and connectivity across cities, towns and surrounding areas” 6 Sites which support these clusters are necessary and could be urban, edge of town or rural. 5.13 Locations with high levels of public transport access should be identified for businesses with high employment densities. This would include sites within walking distance of train stations, travel hubs and along transport corridors. “by ensuring good quality public transport is in place before development, the number of those new residents who will use the transport is maximised. This is also likely to be the best way to stretch some of the high-value businesses based within and around Cambridge out into wider Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. These companies will not want to be distant from the city, but these clusters could ‘grow’ out along the transportation links, providing connection to other market towns.” 7 5.14 Taller prime office buildings could locate at Cambridge’s railway stations to focus development at transport hubs; keeping the city compact, but supporting the demand for high quality office space, particularly that arising from knowledge intensive (KI), especially artificial intelligence firms around Cambridge Central station. This supports CPIERs third key recommendation: “Ensuring that Cambridge continues to deliver for KI businesses should be considered a nationally strategic priority”. 5.15 The cluster effect is well-evidenced in Cambridgeshire and an opportunity exists for Greater Cambridge to encourage the forces of agglomeration through promotion of sites around existing groups of same-sector companies. This is certainly the case for the Science and Technology Sector. A spatial strategy to provide for a range of commercial and job opportunities should be informed by the cluster approach, but not at the expense of unduly restricting employment opportunities across the Plan area, particularly to transport corridors. 5.16 Non-knowledge intensive companies tend to be more footloose and typically locate where premises are provided rather than through bespoke development, while some companies expand from humbler often rural beginnings in converted buildings. To enable this growth dynamic, employment locations in settlements of all sizes and classification should be allocated or be permissible, with larger concentrations of floorspace in areas with better public transport and access to active modes of travel. CPIER supports this position noting that deeper networks on smaller clusters on the periphery of Cambridge could help spread the ‘Cambridge effect’.

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Form ID: 56371
Respondent: PX Farms Ltd
Agent: Bidwells

5.5.1 Locations with high levels of public transport access should be identified for businesses with high employment densities. This would include sites within walking distance of existing settlements, train stations, travel hubs, Park and Ride facilities and along transport corridors. “by ensuring good quality public transport is in place before development, the number of those new residents who will use the transport is maximised. This is also likely to be the best way to stretch some of the high-value businesses based within and around Cambridge out into wider Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. These companies will not want to be distant from the city, but these clusters could ‘grow’ out along the transportation links, providing connection to other market towns.” 2 5.5.2 Non-knowledge intensive companies tend to be more footloose and typically locate where premises are provided rather than through bespoke development, while some companies expand from humbler often rural beginnings in converted buildings. To enable this growth dynamic, employment locations in settlements of all sizes and classification should be allocated or be permissible, with larger concentrations of floorspace in areas with better public transport and access to active modes of travel. CPIER supports this position noting that deeper networks on smaller clusters on the periphery of Cambridge could help spread the ‘Cambridge effect’.

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Form ID: 56412
Respondent: Bidwells
Agent: Bidwells

5.10 The UK industrial Strategy advocates focusing on our strengths, “fostering clusters and connectivity across cities, towns and surrounding areas” 3 Sites which support these clusters are necessary and could be urban, edge of town or rural. 5.11 Locations with high levels of public transport access should be identified for businesses with high employment densities. This would include sites within walking distance of train stations, travel hubs and along transport corridors. “by ensuring good quality public transport is in place before development, the number of those new residents who will use the transport is maximised. This is also likely to be the best way to stretch some of the high-value businesses based within and around Cambridge out into wider Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. These companies will not want to be distant from the city, but these clusters could ‘grow’ out along the transportation links, providing connection to other market towns.” 4 5.12 Taller prime office buildings could locate at Cambridge’s railway stations to focus development at transport hubs; keeping the city compact, but supporting the demand for high quality office space, particularly that arising from knowledge intensive (KI), especially artificial intelligence firms around Cambridge Central station. This supports CPIERs third key recommendation: “Ensuring that Cambridge continues to deliver for KI businesses should be considered a nationally strategic priority”. 5.13 The cluster effect is well-evidenced in Cambridgeshire and an opportunity exists for Greater Cambridge to encourage the forces of agglomeration through promotion of sites around existing groups of same-sector companies. This is certainly the case for the Science and Technology Sector. A spatial strategy to provide for a range of commercial and job opportunities should be informed by the cluster approach, particularly to transport corridors, but not at the expense of unduly restricting employment opportunities across the Plan area. 5.14 Non-knowledge intensive companies tend to be more footloose and typically locate where premises are provided rather than through bespoke development, while some companies expand from humbler often rural beginnings in converted buildings. To enable this growth dynamic, employment locations in settlements of all sizes and classification should be allocated or be permissible, with larger concentrations of floorspace in areas with better public transport and access to active modes of travel.

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