Question 28. In providing for a range of employment space, are there particular locations we should be focusing on? Are there specific locations important for different types of business or industry?

Showing forms 61 to 90 of 108
Form ID: 48573
Respondent: Endurance Estates
Agent: Bidwells

3.31 There is an opportunity to provide new B1 uses as part of a comprehensively planned mixed-use community on the edge of Cambridge. New B1 employment space on the edge of Cambridge would benefit from high levels of connectivity allowing employees to walk, cycle, and use public transport to travel to work.

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Form ID: 48716
Respondent: NIAB Trust
Agent: Strutt & Parker

Q28: In providing for a range of employment space, are there particular locations we should be focussing on? Are there specific locations important for different types of business or industry? It is important that employment is dispersed within the Greater Cambridge area, with not all employment just focused on Cambridge. The potential of land in rural areas beyond existent settlements has to provide land for employment development is recognised in the NPPF at Paragraph 84; “Planning policies and decisions should recognise that sites to meet local business and community needs in rural areas may have to be found adjacent to or beyond existing settlements, and in locations that are not well served by public transport.” Provision for the allocation of employment sites on land adjoining the rural centres and larger villages is appropriate and will help support both the economy of the district and the rural community. This is in line with the NPPF’s aims of supporting a prosperous rural economy. In addition, it is also appropriate to focus a proportionate quantum of employment growth along key transport corridors. As expressed within our answer to Question 25, the AgriTech sector is growing at a significant pace within the Cambridgeshire area. These businesses require employment sites that are on larger outer city sites that are generally more rural in comparison to traditional employment sites located in and around Cambridge. Sites, such as the Land north-east of Villa Road, Histon, submitted by my client as part of the Call for Sites exercise in March 2019 are considered to be appropriate for allocation. In order to enable such sites to come forward and support the growth of the expanding AgriTech industry in Cambridgeshire, the Council will need to amend the boundary of the Green Belt. The preparation of the new Local Plan represents an opportunity to review this boundary in accordance with Paragraph 136 of the NPPF which states that Green Belt boundaries should only be altered where exceptional circumstances are fully evidenced and justified through the preparation and updating of plans. The allocation of my client’s site would attract either AgriTech or high-tech firms to the area to complement the established firms that are located within Vision Park and NIAB’s crop research facilities at Park Farm. This would help to boost the local economy by attracting these firms to the area and create job opportunities. Summary of Comments: Employment space should be dispersed within the Local Plan area and in particular should focus on rural edge of settlement locations.

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Form ID: 48767
Respondent: Trinity College
Agent: Sphere25

Cambridge Science Park North is a critical location for the Cambridge and UK economy, and land focused on skilled manufacturing and development of science and technology products linked to research and development undertaken on Cambridge Science Park should be allocated for employment land in the emerging Local Plan. Cambridge Science Park North will benefit from close proximity and be physically linked to Cambridge Science Park and the benefits of this identified cluster. The site is in a sustainable location, located within walking and cycling distance of existing residents and new homes planned as part of the North East Cambridge Area Action Plan. The site benefits from a position within close proximity to Cambridge North Railway Station, the existing Guided Busway link to Northstowe, and the proposed CAM route to Waterbeach. Indeed a planned stop within Cambridge Science Park North can be developed as part of a wider sustainable transport hub, connecting non-car modes of transport within and beyond the Science Park cluster. Cambridge Science Park North is located within 6km of a proposed 43,600 new homes planned to 2031. Connecting employment and housing by walking, cycling and sustainable public transport infrastructure. Cambridge Science Park North can supply the manufacturing space required to support the Research and Development already being undertaken by Science and Technology companies. Emerging technologies and continual innovation in this crucial element of the UK economy mean that new categories of skilled manufacturing employment could be created. This would help to close the inequality gap in the city, and help lift families out of poverty, particularly those in the immediate vicinity of the proposed development such as Arbury and Kings Hedges. Crucially though, without these manufacturing companies in Cambridge, there is a shortage of job opportunities for people who want to work in a technical or engineering environment but do not have the qualifications to undertake the roles that require a university degree. Opportunities that could benefit students at the Cambridge Regional College and North Cambridge Academy. Cambridge Regional College will be sited between Cambridge Science Park and Cambridge Science Park North, with teaching facilities being located within Cambridge Science Park North and apprenticeship opportunities being created. Linking these activities and working to raise aspirations and remove barriers. As a result of the historical and heritage constraints present in the City of Cambridge, there are limited opportunities for the development of employment space within the city centre. In order to address the shortages of employment space faced within the Greater Cambridgeshire area, planning policy should therefore focus on developing the space surrounding the city but well connected to public transport infrastructure to enable further economic growth within the area. Several examples already exist of successful employment locations outside the city centre, benefitting from the advantages of locating in proximity to a world-leading university but without the prohibitive cost of being in the city centre. These locations, particularly those with a higher level of transport accessibility, have the potential to generate employment at a greater density, enabling the connectivity and knowledge spill over benefits important for the knowledge-intensive industries Greater Cambridge supports. Certain industries, particularly high- and mid-tech sectors, benefit particularly from clustering, meaning that the co-location of these industries with one another results in a better economic outcome, greater productivity and greater growth. The development of these locations which enable this clustering and growth should be a priority for planning policy, as has taken place in a number of other cities within the UK.

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Form ID: 48872
Respondent: Mr and Mrs Bishop
Agent: Barton Willmore

5.1 Greater Cambridge is home to a range of businesses. It does however have a nationally important research and development sector. One particular aspect of this is the growth in research and development in the UK Innovation Corridor to the south of Cambridge. This is a growing industry as emphasised by recent planning applications at South Cambridgeshire District Council for the Wellcome Trust and the SmithsonHill site at Hinxton Grange. 5.2 The CPIER Report identifies the presence of ‘place-based innovation districts’ with the Combined Authority and notes how they often focus upon specific technologies or industries. They have developed given the highly skilled graduates from Cambridge University providing a highly skilled and knowledgeable workforce. The CPIER acknowledges how this becomes a self-perpetuating process by virtue of a concentration of companies attracting more to the area. The Life Science sector for example accounts for 18% of employment in South Cambridgeshire and ‘there is clearly a high national significance to these industries in this area: they bring in business that would otherwise look abroad’ (CPIER Report p.55). 5.3 Key recommendation #3 of the CPIER continues this theme and highlights the need to keep such companies in the area. It states: 5.4 ‘ The UK Government should adopt a ‘Cambridge or overseas’ mentality towards knowledge - intensive (KI) business in this area, recognizing that in an era of international connectivity and footloose labour, many high - value companies will need to relocate abroa d if this area no longer meets their needs. Ensuring that Cambridge continues to deliver for KI businesses should be considered a nationally strategic priority (emphasis added). ’ 5.5 The SmithsonHill application seeks to develop an Agritech Park specialising in agricultural technology and seeks to ‘address the national and global challenges of sustainable food production’. This provides a significant growth area in Greater Cambridge, especially given the topography and land quality in the vicinity. Such areas should be supported to ensure they can continue to grow and continue to attract a highly skilled workforce and provide them accommodation. The Local Plan should focus on ensuring the surrounding land can be utilised by complementary land uses to further evolve such areas.

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Form ID: 48901
Respondent: Jesus College
Agent: Bidwells

5.10 The UK industrial Strategy advocates focusing on our strengths, “fostering clusters and connectivity across cities, towns and surrounding areas” 3 Sites which support these clusters are necessary and could be urban, edge of town or rural. 5.11 Locations with high levels of public transport access should be identified for businesses with high employment densities. This would include sites within walking distance of train stations, travel hubs and along transport corridors. “by ensuring good quality public transport is in place before development, the number of those new residents who will use the transport is maximised. This is also likely to be the best way to stretch some of the high-value businesses based within and around Cambridge out into wider Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. These companies will not want to be distant from the city, but these clusters could ‘grow’ out along the transportation links, providing connection to other market towns.” 4 5.12 Taller prime office buildings could locate at Cambridge’s railway stations to focus development at transport hubs; keeping the city compact, but supporting the demand for high quality office space, particularly that arising from knowledge intensive (KI), especially artificial intelligence firms around Cambridge Central station. This supports CPIERs third key recommendation: “Ensuring that Cambridge continues to deliver for KI businesses should be considered a nationally strategic priority”. 5.13 The cluster effect is well-evidenced in Cambridgeshire and an opportunity exists for Greater Cambridge to encourage the forces of agglomeration through promotion of sites around existing groups of same-sector companies; this is certainly the case for the high-tech cluster at the Cambridge Station Area. A spatial strategy to provide for a range of commercial and job opportunities should be informed by the cluster approach particularly to transport corridors. 3 UK Industrial Strategy 2017 p18 4 CPIER p41

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Form ID: 48998
Respondent: Countryside Properties

3.16 It is important that employment is dispersed within the Greater Cambridge area, with not all employment just focused on Cambridge. As identified in the SPIER report, Cambridge has had extensive economic growth in recent years, which has put substantial pressure on house prices and infrastructure within and around the City. It is important that employment growth is dispersed to larger village settlements outside of the Green Belt, such as Linton. 3.17 Linton is a substantial sized village with considerable services, categorised as a Minor Rural Centre in the adopted Local Plan 2018. There is capacity for Linton to provide an increased amount office space for local business, or start-up businesses from the village, or surrounding villages to work. The employment site would provide the opportunity for residents within the new housing on the site or within the existing village to have a premise for the start-up of new businesses and could include additional facilities such as a nursery and café. 3.18 The proposed employment hub of 1 hectare on land adjacent to Balsham Road, Linton is consistent with the size of the settlement and its position within the settlement hierarchy.

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Form ID: 49039
Respondent: M. F. Mead and Son
Agent: Strutt & Parker

15. It is important that employment is dispersed within the Greater Cambridge area, with not all employment just focused on Cambridge. The potential of land in rural areas beyond existent settlements have in providing land for employment development is recognised in the NPPF at Paragraph 84; “Planning policies and decisions should recognise that sites to meet local business and community needs in rural areas may have to be found adjacent to or beyond existing settlements, and in locations that are not well served by public transport.” Provision for sized employment sites within the larger villages is appropriate and will help support the rural community. In addition, it is also appropriate to focus a proportionate quantum of employment growth along key transport corridors, such as in Foxton, and my client’s site immediately adjacent to Foxton railway station is excellently located to encourage more sustainable modes of transport. 16. As part of the Greater Cambridge Partnership (GCP), a new Travel Hub is proposed within Foxton to encourage the use of public transport to the village. The village’s sustainability is anticipated to increase significantly, resulting in Foxton being a prime location residential and employment development with a much easier link into both Cambridge and London. 17. There is capacity for Foxton to provide an increased amount office space for local business, or start-up businesses from the village, or surrounding villages to work. This relatively small scale employment site would function as a natural addition to the village, within close proximity to the railway station and provide the opportunity for new companies to begin locally, as well as host a work space for existing businesses, without having to travel to Cambridge City. 18. Summary: Support for providing land in sustainable locations such as next to railway stations, to enable economic growth to continue.

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Form ID: 49241
Respondent: L&Q Estates Ltd and Hill Residential Ltd
Agent: Guy Kaddish

Locations with high levels of public transport access should be identified for businesses with high employment densities. This would include sites within walking distance of train stations, travel hubs and along transport corridors. “by ensuring good quality public transport is in place before development, the number of those new residents who will use the transport is maximised. This is also likely to be the best way to stretch some of the high-value businesses based within and around Cambridge out into wider Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. These companies will not want to be distant from the city, but these clusters could ‘grow’ out along the transportation links, providing connection to other market towns.” 2 The new community proposed at the Six Mile Bottom Estate would provide for jobs and homes significantly reducing the need for car journeys. The proposal is for a balanced job ratio of 2 CPIER p41 approximately one job per household, this level of internalisation of job creation will significantly aid to achieving zero carbon. The Vision capitalises on: ● The Site's locational advantage in respect of Cambridge’s established high tech business locations and its associated supply chain, as well as The Fens micro and agritech businesses; ● Its emphasis on delivering fast and convenient public transit / mobility through rail, road and CAM; ● The compact and critical mass of its resident population creating a Natural Capital approach to capturing the growing home-work / flexible workplace opportunities, and; ● An ability to deliver a zero carbon living and working environment in part through significant on-site renewables. We anticipate these unique qualities will support significant job growth and new employment facilities at Six Mile Bottom for: ● The high tech sector; ● Establishing an Agri/Equine Tech ‘launchpad’; ● Create significant advance of home-work hubs; ● Co-working and flexible working centres; as well as, ● Providing strategic space for supply chain and emerging technologies that would benefit from the locational benefits. Whilst this approach to jobs is specific to the established and emerging work sectors, it importantly creates the conditions for new businesses, start ups and grown on space to succeed, and critically provides the mobility, energy and community infrastructure to deliver a zero carbon living and working community.

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Form ID: 49306
Respondent: Dencora Trinity LLP
Agent: Carter Jonas

It is essential that the Local Plan caters for a range of employment uses many of which support knowledge-intensive sectors, but are not straight R&D uses. The key emergence over the past few years has been the expansion in the number of ‘hybrid’ research and development buildings that are required to cater for this mix of high-quality businesses. Examples of these can be found in the science parks around Cambridge and typically they comprise modern warehouse-type construction with high quality office fit-out typically occupying 20–50 per cent of the built space. Externally, the buildings will have the appearance of office buildings with high quality landscaping, street furniture and external finishes. They will combine office functions, but also research and development and production facilities, all under one roof. There is now an established demand from across the ‘mid-tech’, ‘high technology’ and ‘bio tech’ industries (amongst others) for hybrid business units that cater for a mix of business needs, and such uses are considered to be ideally located within the promoted Site (Trinity Hall Industrial Estate). However, is also important that the policy context that employment sites are not unduly restrictive or onerous, to the extent that it represents a barrier to delivery of alternative uses, which may be of equal merit or need, which could otherwise be accommodated within the development site. Policies should not seek to prioritise existing or specific proposed uses at all costs, but allow for alternative uses should there be an identified need or demand. The market is evolving and over the lifespan of the Local Plan there needs to be flexibility. The policies in the existing Local Plan are too inflexible and seek to protect employment uses for their own sake irrespective of the location, the suitability of the use in a particular location, the condition of the existing buildings or unforeseen opportunities for alternative uses (where there is a clearly identified need). An example of which could be a D1 education related use. There should be a broader definition of employment development, and where development is employment led, a range of alternative uses should be permitted provided these complement and not unreasonably dilute the core function of the employment site, rather than having a restrictive approach the references B1, B2 and B8 uses only.

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Form ID: 49374
Respondent: Cambridge Past, Present & Future

• Rather than scattering employment sites across Greater Cambridge, they should be concentrated as far as possible into clusters which are served by public transport. Clusters within Cambridge are likely to attract knowledge-based employment with service and ancillary sectors mainly outside the City, where rents are lower. • A number of science, technology, and business parks in South Cambridgeshire, like Melbourn Science Park, Granta Park and Cambridge Innovation Park, currently have available space or the potential for further growth. Appropriate new employment should be focused in such sites before creating new commercial parks. • In our response to Question 24, we stressed the importance of employment space being provided in the new settlements. This is not just in order to help them achieve a degree of containment, but also because they should have environmentally sound transport access to Cambridge. More generally we believe that accessibility by walking/cycling and public transport should be a major consideration in deciding locations for employment space.

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Form ID: 49501
Respondent: Cambridge Cycling Campaign

• Businesses and industrial spaces need to be connected to the high-quality cycling network, as well as public transport, in order to ensure that people have the opportunity to get to work without driving. • New developments should always include some space for adaptable businesses and light industrial uses, in order to provide employment in the community that is easily accessed on foot or bike, and a healthy mix of activities in new developments. • The Local Plan must not allow car-dependent ‘dormitory estates’ where everyone is forced to travel long distances to access everyday activities like jobs, schools, surgeries and shopping. • Absolutely no employment site should be developed or expanded in any location before sustainable transport links have been established. Cycling, bus and train links must be there before a single employee starts work and forms the habit of driving a car to work. • Planning needs to consider trip-chaining that occurs on the way to work. Are there shops, childcare facilities and places for lunch that are easily accessed by walking and cycling on the way to and during the work day? • Large campus developments without good sustainable transport links can be isolated and leave people stranded if they don’t have a car. Campus transport that focuses on 9–5 workers leaves part-time workers stranded, and offers no opportunity for people who have to leave suddenly in the middle of the day (e.g. for a child’s emergency). “Investment in walking and cycling infrastructure is still needed, but the continued success of walking and cycling environments also depends on the extent to which new and existing residential areas are able to develop a critical mass of destinations (such as workplaces and facilities) within short distances.” (Bertolini, 2003) Evidence for our response to Question 28. • Bertolini, Luca and le Clercq, Frank (2003). Urban development without more mobility by car?. Environment and Planning A 2003, volume 35, pp 575–589.

Form ID: 49542
Respondent: Histon & Impington Parish Council

As was discovered by the consultants working on the economic plan for Northstowe, high tech businesses really want to cluster close together. Northstowe was found to be too distant from Cambridge. Zoning or other means of encouraging moving further out may more likely result in them going to other hubs. Having employment opportunities where people live (as well as facilitating increased working from home) will reduce infrastructure, increase costs and be a major plus for reducing carbon footprint.

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Form ID: 49619
Respondent: Essex County Council

In deciding employment growth locations, the provision of active and sustainable travel should be paramount. Consideration should also be given to improving access to localities within Essex that provide a draw for existing and future businesses, in particular Harlow, Great Chesterford Research Park, London Stansted Airport and localities along the West Anglian Mainline.

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Form ID: 49698
Respondent: Emma Garnett

• Businesses and industrial spaces need to be connected to the high-quality cycling network, as well as public transport, in order to ensure that people have the opportunity to get to work without driving. • New developments should always include some space for adaptable businesses and light industrial uses, in order to provide employment in the community that is easily accessed on foot or bike, and a healthy mix of activities in new developments. • The Local Plan must not allow car-dependent 'dormitory estates' where everyone is forced to travel long distances to access everyday activities like jobs, schools, surgeries and shopping. • Absolutely no employment site should be developed or expanded in any location before sustainable transport links have been established. Cycling, bus and train links must be there before a single employee starts work and forms the habit of driving a car to work.

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Form ID: 49746
Respondent: Martin Grant Homes Ltd & Harcourt Developments Ltd
Agent: Savills

Economic growth in the area is currently focussed on Cambridge, but the ‘Cambridge Effect’ extends beyond the city boundaries and increasingly has the potential to extend across the Oxford Cambridge Arc. There is limited potential for development in the city of Cambridge, which should be explored as a priority. Subsequently, the best locations are those that can areas accommodate clusters of economic activity, with self-sustaining residential communities linked to them in the areas surrounding the city and well linked to it by public transport options. A good example is to the north of Cambridge where the Cambridge Research Park is supported by a new community at Waterbeach. New infrastructure is now proposed to be delivered at Cambourne to the west of Cambridge, to include East West Rail and the Cambridge Autonomous Metro (CAM), This confluence of infrastructure support and opportunity can support further employment development at Cambourne in a way that is linked to the city in a highly sustainable way.

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Form ID: 49765
Respondent: Lolworth Developments Limited
Agent: Bidwells

Lolworth Developments Ltd (LDL) has submitted a 100ha employment site proposal to the 'Call for Sites' consultation in March 2019. LDL has submitted further supporting evidence as to why the site is the best location to serve the area and the 'final mile' into Cambridge. See Strategic Case Report and Vision Document submitted under Q2. The UK industrial Strategy advocates focusing on our strengths, “fostering clusters and connectivity across cities, towns and surrounding areas”. Sites which support these clusters are necessary and could be urban, edge of town or rural. Locations with high levels of public transport access should be identified for businesses with high employment densities. This would include sites within walking distance of train stations, travel hubs and along transport corridors, showing good connectivity. “by ensuring good quality public transport is in place before development, the number of those new residents who will use the transport is maximised. This is also likely to be the best way to stretch some of the high-value businesses based within and around Cambridge out into wider Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. These companies will not want to be distant from the city, but these clusters could ‘grow’ out along the transportation links, providing connection to other market towns.” Different types of employment require appropriate locations dependent upon the nature of the employment sector. The logistics (storage and distribution use) sector requires a location with excellent access to the strategic road network via appropriate junction design, on key transport corridors close to market needs and sources of local workforce in terms of job provision. Thus, LDL has identified the ideal location for storage and distribution together with flexible co-working space on land between Bar Hill and the new settlement of Northstowe. This location will be important for the 'last mile' in and out of Cambridge, but importantly its location will be attractive to the logistics providers. Summary Lolworth Developments Ltd's (LDL) proposal for 100ha employment east of Bar Hill will deliver the best site for logistics based employment use for the 'last mile' in and out of Cambridge. This use requires a location on key transport corridors close to market needs and sources of local workforce in terms of job provision. Thus, LDL has identified the ideal location for storage and distribution together with flexible coworking space on land between Bar Hill and the new settlement of Northstowe. This location will be important for the 'last mile' in and out of Cambridge, but importantly its location will be attractive to the logistics providers. Summary of Comments: Please see summary above.

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Form ID: 49789
Respondent: Thakeham Homes Ltd

Councils’ should not just focus on existing employment locations within Cambridge Cite Centre, but should also plan for new employment space or flexible co-working space in new settlements and adjacent to neighbourhoods or villages, thereby reducing the need to travel, and supporting the Councils’ net zero carbon aspirations. This would allow for new and flexible working practices and enable a rapid response to changes in economic circumstances in accordance with the NPPF (Paragraph 81).

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Form ID: 49815
Respondent: Lolworth Developments Limited
Agent: Bidwells

Lolworth Developments Ltd (LDL) has submitted a 100ha employment site proposal to the 'Call for Sites' consultation in March 2019. LDL has submitted further supporting evidence as to why the site is the best location to serve the area and the 'final mile' into Cambridge. See Strategic Case Report and Vision Document submitted under Q2. The UK industrial Strategy advocates focusing on our strengths, “fostering clusters and connectivity across cities, towns and surrounding areas”. Sites which support these clusters are necessary and could be urban, edge of town or rural. Locations with high levels of public transport access should be identified for businesses with high employment densities. This would include sites within walking distance of train stations, travel hubs and along transport corridors, showing good connectivity. “by ensuring good quality public transport is in place before development, the number of those new residents who will use the transport is maximised. This is also likely to be the best way to stretch some of the high-value businesses based within and around Cambridge out into wider Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. These companies will not want to be distant from the city, but these clusters could ‘grow’ out along the transportation links, providing connection to other market towns.” Different types of employment require appropriate locations dependent upon the nature of the employment sector. The logistics (storage and distribution use) sector requires a location with excellent access to the strategic road network via appropriate junction design, on key transport corridors close to market needs and sources of local workforce in terms of job provision. Thus, LDL has identified the ideal location for storage and distribution together with flexible co-working space on land between Bar Hill and the new settlement of Northstowe. This location will be important for the 'last mile' in and out of Cambridge, but importantly its location will be attractive to the logistics providers. Summary Lolworth Developments Ltd's (LDL) proposal for 100ha employment east of Bar Hill will deliver the best site for logistics based employment use for the 'last mile' in and out of Cambridge. This use requires a location on key transport corridors close to market needs and sources of local workforce in terms of job provision. Thus, LDL has identified the ideal location for storage and distribution together with flexible coworking space on land between Bar Hill and the new settlement of Northstowe. This location will be important for the 'last mile' in and out of Cambridge, but importantly its location will be attractive to the logistics providers. Summary of Comments: Please see summary above.

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Form ID: 49891
Respondent: Cambourne Town Council

Near larger settlements and good transport links.

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Form ID: 49987
Respondent: Newlands Developments
Agent: Turley

4.85 The provision of employment clusters that provide for a range of users, including B1c, B2 and B8 in close proximity to major road networks at the edge of villages or in close proximity to services and existing employment uses should be given serious consideration. 4.86 Moreover, such locations with the joint district area are considered crucial for the efficient operation of the logistics section for example, especially enabling optimised ‘last mile’ facilities from which to run efficient and low congestion operations as highlighted in our response to Question 27 above. 4.87 In light of this, we consider that the Brickyard Farm, Boxworth site offers a unique and essential opportunity to address the gap in supply to meet particular needs and requirements of the logistics sector, on a site that can meet the bespoke requirements (build-to-suit) requirements of occupiers in an already established employment location adjacent to the improved A14.

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Form ID: 50082
Respondent: Marshall Group Properties
Agent: Quod

In terms of site-specific locations for where growth should go, Cambridge East is the only location specifically identified in the CPIER. CPIER Paragraph 42 states: "In Cambridge specifically, though there are limitations to the growth of the city in other directions, the east side of the city offers significant scope for housing and commercial development. Such development would have the advantage of being close to the principal centres of employment and the existing rail infrastructure whilst also opening up opportunities for new transport links to connect the main centres of employment more effectively. Most significantly, it includes land which has previously been safeguarded for development and is within the boundaries of the existing urban area so would provide opportunities in line with the existing spatial strategy." The principle of residential and employment uses have already been established at Cambridge East through the AAP and this site is the primary candidate for large-scale mixed use development that can meet a range of employment needs.

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Form ID: 50151
Respondent: Trinity College
Agent: Bidwells

6.13 The UK industrial Strategy advocates focusing on our strengths, “fostering clusters and connectivity across cities, towns and surrounding areas” 3 Sites which support these clusters are necessary and could be urban, edge of town or rural. 6.14 Locations with high levels of public transport access should be identified for businesses with high employment densities. This would include sites within walking distance of train stations, travel hubs and along transport corridors. “by ensuring good quality public transport is in place before development, the number of those new residents who will use the transport is maximised. This is also likely to be the best way to stretch some of the high-value businesses based within and around Cambridge out into wider Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. These companies will not want to be distant from the city, but these clusters could ‘grow’ out along the transportation links, providing connection to other market towns.” 4 6.15 The cluster effect is well-evidenced in Cambridgeshire and an opportunity exists for Greater Cambridge to encourage the forces of agglomeration through promotion of sites around existing groups of same-sector companies. This is certainly the case for the Science and Technology Sector. A spatial strategy to provide for a range of commercial and job opportunities should be informed by the cluster approach, but not at the expense of unduly restricting employment opportunities across the Plan area, particularly to transport corridors. 6.16 Non-knowledge intensive companies tend to be more footloose and typically locate where premises are provided rather than through bespoke development, while some companies expand from humbler often rural beginnings in converted buildings. To enable this growth dynamic employment locations in settlements of all sizes and classification should be allocated or be permissible, with larger concentrations of floorspace in areas with better public transport and access to active modes of travel. CPIER supports this position noting that deeper networks on smaller clusters on the periphery of Cambridge could help spread the ‘Cambridge effect’. 6.17 Land at the Gas Field is a suitable location for flexible commercial development to maximise the site’s transport connections and location near to other key employment sites including the West Cambridge University Site and other key research and laboratory space in the area. Clustering of like-minded companies is proven to be beneficial to those companies and their enhanced contrition to the local economy. Development at Gas Field could contribute further to the North West Cambridge area. 3 UK Industrial Strategy 2017 p18 4 CPIER p41

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Form ID: 50189
Respondent: Campaign to Protect Rural England (CPRE)

The existing Science Parks are clearly important sites and for medical science the area around Addenbrookes is important. The Genome campus, Granta Park and just across the border with Essex, Chesterford Park are all important. Melbourne Science Park, although in Herts must also be considered. Redevelopment of the Barrington cement works is an opportunity for heavier industrial units. One has to ask, is it really a good idea to lose the specialist engineering employment opportunities which Cambridge Airport and Marshalls currently provides.

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Form ID: 50273
Respondent: Brookgate Property and Aviva Investors
Agent: Bidwells

5.12 The UK industrial Strategy advocates focusing on our strengths, “fostering clusters and connectivity across cities, towns and surrounding areas” 3 Sites which support these clusters are necessary and could be urban, edge of town or rural. 5.13 Locations with high levels of public transport access should be identified for businesses with high employment densities. This would include sites within walking distance of train stations, travel hubs and along transport corridors. “by ensuring good quality public transport is in place before development, the number of those new residents who will use the transport is maximised. This is also likely to be the best way to stretch some of the high-value businesses based within and around Cambridge out into wider Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. These companies will not want to be distant from the city, but these clusters could ‘grow’ out along the transportation links, providing connection to other market towns.” 4 5.14 Taller prime office buildings could locate at Cambridge’s railway stations to focus development at transport hubs; keeping the city compact, but supporting the demand for high quality office space, particularly that arising from knowledge intensive (KI), especially artificial intelligence firms around Cambridge Central station. This is supports CPIERs third key recommendation: “Ensuring that Cambridge continues to deliver for KI businesses should be considered a nationally strategic priority”. 5.15 The cluster effect is well-evidenced in Cambridgeshire and an opportunity exists for Greater Cambridge to encourage the forces of agglomeration through promotion of sites around existing groups of same-sector companies. This is certainly the case for the Science and Technology Sector. A spatial strategy to provide for a range of commercial and job opportunities should be informed by the cluster approach, but not at the expense of unduly restricting employment opportunities across the Plan area, particularly to transport corridors. 5.16 Non-knowledge intensive companies tend to be more footloose and typically locate where premises are provided rather than through bespoke development, while some companies expand from humbler often rural beginnings in converted buildings. To enable this growth dynamic employment locations in settlements of all sizes and classification should be allocated or be permissible, with larger concentrations of floorspace in areas with better public transport and access to active modes of travel. CPIER supports this position noting that deeper networks on smaller clusters on the periphery of Cambridge could help spread the ‘Cambridge effect’. 3 UK Industrial Strategy 2017 p18 4 CPIER p41

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Form ID: 50355
Respondent: Brookgate
Agent: Bidwells

5.12 The UK industrial Strategy advocates focusing on our strengths, “fostering clusters and connectivity across cities, towns and surrounding areas” 3 Sites which support these clusters are necessary and could be urban, edge of town or rural. 5.13 Locations with high levels of public transport access should be identified for businesses with high employment densities. This would include sites within walking distance of train stations, travel hubs and along transport corridors. “by ensuring good quality public transport is in place before development, the number of those new residents who will use the transport is maximised. This is also likely to be the best way to stretch some of the high-value businesses based within and around Cambridge out into wider Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. These companies will not want to be distant from the city, but these clusters could ‘grow’ out along the transportation links, providing connection to other market towns.” 4 5.14 Taller prime office buildings could locate at Cambridge’s railway stations to focus development at transport hubs; keeping the city compact, but supporting the demand for high quality office space, particularly that arising from knowledge intensive (KI), especially artificial intelligence firms around Cambridge Central station. This supports CPIERs third key recommendation: “Ensuring that Cambridge continues to deliver for KI businesses should be considered a nationally strategic priority”. 5.15 The cluster effect is well-evidenced in Cambridgeshire and an opportunity exists for Greater Cambridge to encourage the forces of agglomeration through promotion of sites around existing groups of same-sector companies. This is certainly the case for the Science and Technology Sector. A spatial strategy to provide for a range of commercial and job opportunities should be informed by the cluster approach, but not at the expense of unduly restricting employment opportunities across the Plan area, particularly to transport corridors. 5.16 Non-knowledge intensive companies tend to be more footloose and typically locate where premises are provided rather than through bespoke development, while some companies expand from humbler often rural beginnings in converted buildings. To enable this growth dynamic employment locations in settlements of all sizes and classification should be allocated or be permissible, with larger concentrations of floorspace in areas with better public transport and access to active modes of travel. CPIER supports this position noting that deeper networks on smaller clusters on the periphery of Cambridge could help spread the ‘Cambridge effect’. 3 UK Industrial Strategy 2017 p18 4 CPIER p41

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Form ID: 50405
Respondent: Janus Henderson UK Property PAIF
Agent: Bidwells

5.13 The UK industrial Strategy advocates focusing on our strengths, “fostering clusters and connectivity across cities, towns and surrounding areas” 3 Sites which support these clusters are necessary and could be urban, edge of town or rural. 5.14 Locations with high levels of public transport access should be identified for businesses with high employment densities. This would include sites within walking distance of train stations, travel hubs and along transport corridors. “by ensuring good quality public transport is in place before development, the number of those new residents who will use the transport is maximised. This is also likely to be the best way to stretch some of the high-value businesses based within and around Cambridge out into wider Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. These companies will not want to be distant from the city, but these clusters could ‘grow’ out along the transportation links, providing connection to other market towns.” 4 5.15 The cluster effect is well-evidenced in Cambridgeshire and an opportunity exists for Greater Cambridge to encourage the forces of agglomeration through promotion of sites around existing groups of same-sector companies. This is certainly the case for the Science and Technology Sector. A spatial strategy to provide for a range of commercial and job opportunities should be informed by the cluster approach, but not at the expense of unduly restricting employment opportunities across the Plan area, particularly to transport corridors. 5.16 Non-knowledge intensive companies tend to be more footloose and typically locate where premises are provided rather than through bespoke development, while some companies expand from humbler often rural beginnings in converted buildings. To enable this growth dynamic employment locations in settlements of all sizes and classification should be allocated or be permissible, with larger concentrations of floorspace in areas with better public transport and access to active modes of travel. CPIER supports this position noting that deeper networks on smaller clusters on the periphery of Cambridge could help spread the ‘Cambridge effect’. 5.17 Land at Capital Park is a suitable location for flexible commercial development to maximise the site’s transport connections and location near to other key employment sites including ARM and other key research and laboratory space in the area. Clustering of like-minded companies is proven to be beneficial to those companies and their enhanced contrition to the local economy. Development at Capital Park could contribute further to the East Cambridge area. 3 UK Industrial Strategy 2017 p18 4 CPIER p41

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Form ID: 50570
Respondent: Cambridge University Health Partners
Agent: Cambridge University Health Partners

Planning for the long-term success of the life sciences sector is particularly important given the rapid take-up of land at Cambridge Biomedical Campus (CBC). The Local Plan should make provision for future life science development to 2040 and beyond, recognising that knowledgeintensive businesses benefit from co-location with other sector specialists and from close proximity to clinical service and academic expertise. A CBC Strategy Group with representation from all campus organisations has agreed to develop a Vision 2050 for the CBC. Subject to ratification by the CBC Strategy Group, this will be shared with the Greater Cambridge Planning Service by summer 2020 to define the extent, scale and location of development proposed throughout the timescale of the next Local Plan, and the anticipated number of jobs to be supported by the CBC by 2050. CUHP is committed to working with the Greater Cambridge Planning Service to develop an appropriate policy framework to guide the future development of the CBC.

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Form ID: 50630
Respondent: PX Farms Ltd
Agent: Bidwells

5.5.1 Locations with high levels of public transport access should be identified for businesses with high employment densities. This would include sites within walking distance of existing settlements, train stations, travel hubs, Park and Ride facilities and along transport corridors. “by ensuring good quality public transport is in place before development, the number of those new residents who will use the transport is maximised. This is also likely to be the best way to stretch some of the high-value businesses based within and around Cambridge out into wider Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. These companies will not want to be distant from the city, but these clusters could ‘grow’ out along the transportation links, providing connection to other market towns.” 2 5.5.2 Non-knowledge intensive companies tend to be more footloose and typically locate where premises are provided rather than through bespoke development, while some companies expand from humbler often rural beginnings in converted buildings. To enable this growth dynamic, employment locations in settlements of all sizes and classification should be allocated or be permissible, with larger concentrations of floorspace in areas with better public transport and access to active modes of travel. CPIER supports this position noting that deeper networks on smaller clusters on the periphery of Cambridge could help spread the ‘Cambridge effect’. 2 CPIER p41

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Form ID: 50666
Respondent: Thakeham Homes Ltd

Thakeham is of the view that the Councils’ should not just focus on existing employment locations but should also plan for new business space or flexible co-working space in and adjacent to neighbourhoods or villages, thereby reducing the need to travel, and supporting the Councils’ net zero carbon aspirations. This would allow for new and flexible working practices and enable a rapid response to changes in economic circumstances in accordance with the NPPF (Paragraph 81). The Land east of Long Road, Comberton could deliver both modern homes, that have been designed to allow working from home, as well as new modern business/flexible co-working space for the wider community, to respond to the community’s requirements. The new co-working space could include an office rental space, such as a ‘WeWork’ style initiative, or through rental laboratory space, such as a ‘Biocity’ style concept for the medi-tech sector. This co-working space would be developed in consultation with the community, which could then be gifted to the community as a community asset. Please refer to the appended Vision Document titled 'Land east of Long Road, Comberton' produced by Thakeham.

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Form ID: 50759
Respondent: Trinity College
Agent: Bidwells

5.10 The UK industrial Strategy advocates focusing on our strengths, “fostering clusters and connectivity across cities, towns and surrounding areas” 3 Sites which support these clusters are necessary and could be urban, edge of town or rural. 5.11 Locations with high levels of public transport access should be identified for businesses with high employment densities. This would include sites within walking distance of train stations, travel hubs and along transport corridors. “by ensuring good quality public transport is in place before development, the number of those new residents who will use the transport is maximised. This is also likely to be the best way to stretch some of the high-value businesses based within and around Cambridge out into wider Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. These companies will not want to be distant from the city, but these clusters could ‘grow’ out along the transportation links, providing connection to other market towns.” 4 5.12 Taller prime office buildings could locate at Cambridge’s railway stations to focus development at transport hubs; keeping the city compact, but supporting the demand for high quality office space, particularly that arising from knowledge intensive (KI), especially artificial intelligence firms around Cambridge Central station. This supports CPIERs third key recommendation: “Ensuring that Cambridge continues to deliver for KI businesses should be considered a nationally strategic priority”. 5.13 The cluster effect is well-evidenced in Cambridgeshire and an opportunity exists for Greater Cambridge to encourage the forces of agglomeration through promotion of sites around existing groups of same-sector companies. This is certainly the case for the Science and Technology Sector. A spatial strategy to provide for a range of commercial and job opportunities should be informed by the cluster approach, particularly to transport corridors, but not at the expense of unduly restricting employment opportunities across the Plan area. 5.14 Non-knowledge intensive companies tend to be more footloose and typically locate where premises are provided rather than through bespoke development, while some companies expand from humbler often rural beginnings in converted buildings. To enable this growth dynamic, employment locations in settlements of all sizes and classification should be allocated or be permissible, with larger concentrations of floorspace in areas with better public transport and access to active modes of travel. 3 UK Industrial Strategy 2017 p18 4 CPIER p41

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