Question 25. What kind of business and industrial space do you think is most needed in the area?

Showing forms 61 to 90 of 102
Form ID: 48715
Respondent: NIAB Trust
Agent: Strutt & Parker

Q25: What kind of business and industrial space do you think is most needed in the area? A range of both business and industrial space is needed within the area, including distribution, start-up business and AgriTech business space. Business space that would provide for smaller start-up businesses should be allowed for within and on the edge of the surrounding towns and villages in the district. These sites would allow for the flexibility that start-up/growing businesses need with good connectivity into Cambridge City. The opportunity provided by small start-up space allows businesses to invest and expand over time, which will create additional employment opportunities and growth within the District. Our client’s site, Land north-east of Villa Road, Impington is located an optimal distance from Cambridge and could provide crucial business space in a sustainable out of city location. The site also benefits from its location on the edge of Histon and Impington, in a location within close proximity of a potential new bus stop along the guided busway, promoted as part of the emerging Neighbourhood Plan. Furthermore, the AgriTech sector is growing at a significant pace within the Cambridgeshire area. The appropriate building space and agricultural land needs to be allocated to progress this growth and ensure its development continues to move forward. With the UK facing food security issues and a future sustainability crisis due to Climate Change, it is important that the appropriate sites are allocated for AgriTech businesses to tackle these issues and address one of the big themes of the new Local Plan. AgriTech businesses require sites that are on larger rural outer city locations in comparison to the traditional employment sites located in and around Cambridge. The development and enhancement of the AgriTech industry will in turn support Cambridge’s existing and established high tech industry, resulting in economic benefits for both South Cambridgeshire and the City. Summary of Comments: Business space for start up, AgriTech and HighTech industries is most needed in the area. Allocations for AgriTech sites is important.

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Form ID: 48764
Respondent: Trinity College
Agent: Sphere25

Although there exists a need for a number of different commercial use types, Greater Cambridgeshire derives its international reputation as a leading city area from the knowledgeintensive businesses it supports. The shortage of sufficient and appropriate commercial floorspace for these businesses would threaten the economic advantage Greater Cambridgeshire holds in these industries, putting at risk the employment and economic activity they generate for local residents and therefore the UK as a whole. Cambridge benefits from an incredibly successful Research and Development based economy. Indeed, Cambridge is home to companies that are famous for innovation. Trinity College through its development and nurturing of Cambridge Science Park has always been a pioneer in terms of supporting growth in Science and Technology in Cambridge. Innovation involves a high degree of risk; in particular, the risk that products may not perform in the real world in the same way they did in the laboratory or workshop. Often products need to be redesigned or adapted to meet the needs of the market. Moreover, in order to stay ahead of their competitors, research intensive companies need to implement a programme of continuous innovation. They cannot afford to stand still. Technology companies will increasingly prefer to undertake their manufacturing close to their research base where changes in design can easily be implemented and new product ideas rapidly prototyped and tested. This is particularly true in the case of the low-volume, high value products such as robotics, medical devices, electronics and batteries - areas where Cambridge leads the world. Whilst there is a good supply of premises suitable for undertaking product research, when it comes to high quality, affordable prototyping manufacturing and testing space, there is a major shortage. This type of employment use needs to operate from larger buildings and cannot operate from the stock of offices and laboratories currently available within the local market. Available suitable space is being and has been lost from both the Cambridge area and the existing Cambridge Science Park itself due to increasing office and laboratory values; and lost as a result of past and proposed housing development and allocations. This shortage means companies are being forced to undertake their manufacturing in other regions of the UK or overseas. The geographic distance between their research and manufacturing facilities can negatively impact their business performance, not least because it creates a culture of “them and us”. At Cambridge Science Park North new skilled manufacturing employment opportunities would be created to support the growth of exportable high-value, low-volume science and technology product development. The impending relocation of Marshalls and uncertainty with regard to timescales, amplifies the need for investment in this type of job and employment growth within the Cambridge economy. Providing more balanced employment opportunities in skilled manufacturing in the short term, whilst providing longer term economic growth.

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Form ID: 48898
Respondent: Jesus College
Agent: Bidwells

5.4 A wide variety of business and industrial space is needed in Greater Cambridge, in terms of location, size, function and price, in order to support the growth of the economy, offering choice to meet an occupier’s individual needs: “The requirements for physical space, like finance, have stages. What a business needs in its start-up phase is different to its needs as it matures and grows. It is vital, if an innovation ecosystem is to be effective for there to be variety and availability at every stage1. 5.5 The Science and Technology sector is the engine of the Cambridge Phenomenon that has driven the economy and it will remain an important part of the local economy and job market. One particular requirement is to support and grow the burgeoning high-tech and AI sector forming in the Cambridge Station area that has attracted high-calibre global companies. Land north of Station Road represents an opportunity to make more efficient use of previously developed land in a highly accessible location and provide more jobs to support the cluster and increase the site’s contribution to GVA by some £75 million. 5.6 All new employment space should be located and built to maximise the health and wellbeing of employees and visitors. Healthy buildings in locations that reduce commute times and improve the sleep and wellbeing of its occupants contribute significantly to their productivity. Improving productivity is a primary route through which the Greater Cambridgeshire economic expansion objectives of doubling GVA and inclusive growth will be achieved. “If workers can be more productive, they can bring home more take home pay, which will flow into the local economy. And they will be able to enjoy a higher standard of life. It is this, before anything else, which needs to be looked at to create an inclusive economic future.” CPIER p38 1 - Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Industrial Strategy 2019 p 41

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Form ID: 49240
Respondent: L&Q Estates Ltd and Hill Residential Ltd
Agent: Guy Kaddish

The Local Plan needs to ensure that there is sufficient land for business uses, in the right places and to suit different business types and specific business clusters. The Local Plan should recognise that employers come in a range of sizes, from start-ups with a few individuals to major firms with hundreds of employees, and the area needs to have the right range of premises to support these varied needs. As recognised in the Issues and Options consultation document, while technology is important to the local economy, other types of industry and agriculture also play an important role and ensure a variety of jobs for local people. To ensure a broad economic basis, it is essential that a range of business and industrial space is provided. This should include space for start ups (for those business in the early stage of a new business), Incubator (providing start-up and scale-up space for companies, including support and services) and grow-on space (premises suitable for small growing businesses). The plan should be flexible to adapt to changing working practices and respond quickly to opportunities for specialist space.

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Form ID: 49371
Respondent: Cambridge Past, Present & Future

• Over-reliance on inward investment is a high-risk strategy. To support indigenous growth through knowledge-based firms, the Plan should encourage development of incubator and innovation developments in prime locations. Cambridge needs to do more to support its own “home-grown” commercial opportunities • The departure of Marshalls from their East Cambridge site will significantly disrupt the balance of employment opportunities and training opportunities in the Plan area. Manufacturing should be recognised as contributing both to the range of employment opportunities and in capturing value from scientific and technological innovation. The Plan should ensure that any major new developments allocate land for manufacturing enterprises.

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Form ID: 49500
Respondent: Cambridge Cycling Campaign

• Businesses and industrial spaces need to be connected to the high-quality cycling network, as well as public transport, in order to ensure that people have the opportunity to get to work without driving. • New developments should always include some space for adaptable businesses and light industrial uses, in order to provide employment in the community that is easily accessed on foot or bike, and a healthy mix of activities in new developments. • The Local Plan must not allow car-dependent ‘dormitory estates’ where everyone is forced to travel long distances to access everyday activities like jobs, schools, surgeries and shopping.

Form ID: 49539
Respondent: Histon & Impington Parish Council

The anticipated growth in high and bio tech will need support from supply industries (e.g. Lab equipment supplies, data analysis, software) and the employees will need all the usual supply and support services for general living (garage services, shops, building supplies etc.) Both will be needed. Lower tech space also required as being employed/felt useful is critical to personal wellbeing - we need to ensure that those who have skills elsewhere than high tech have opportunities. As with many of the topics covered by all these questions a regular review of requirements should be undertaken to ensure the forecasted development align with actuals.

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Form ID: 49697
Respondent: Emma Garnett

• Businesses and industrial spaces need to be connected to the high-quality cycling network, as well as public transport, in order to ensure that people have the opportunity to get to work without driving. • New developments should always include some space for adaptable businesses and light industrial uses, in order to provide employment in the community that is easily accessed on foot or bike, and a healthy mix of activities in new developments. • The Local Plan must not allow car-dependent 'dormitory estates' where everyone is forced to travel long distances to access everyday activities like jobs, schools, surgeries and shopping.

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Form ID: 49743
Respondent: Martin Grant Homes Ltd & Harcourt Developments Ltd
Agent: Savills

MGH will await the further evidence base and technical studies that are to be provided as part of the Local Plan consultation process. Research to date in the CPIER and elsewhere* shows that there is a very large demand for employment in the area and a great opportunity for Greater Cambridge to diversify the range of employment offered in order to deliver a robust economy that is beneficial to all elements of society not just those in a particular location or employed in a specific sector. *Cambridge, A city state of mind, Savills, 2018 and The Oxford-Cambridge Innovation Arc, Savills, 2019

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Form ID: 49761
Respondent: Lolworth Developments Limited
Agent: Bidwells

Lolworth Developments Ltd (LDL) has submitted a 100ha employment site proposal to the 'Call for Sites' consultation in March 2019. LDL has submitted further supporting evidence as to why the site is the best location to serve the area and the 'final mile' into Cambridge. See Strategic Case Report and Vision Document submitted under Q2. There is, and will continue to be, a need for a wide variety of space by location, size, function and price needs to be available to support the growth of the local and regional economy, offering choice to meet an occupier’s individual needs. There is an acute shortage in the area. “The requirements for physical space, like finance, have stages. What a business needs in its start-up phase is different to its needs as it matures and grows. It is vital, if an innovation ecosystem is to be effective for there to be variety and availability at every stage". More provision is needed. Flexible commercial space in urban and rural areas to support growth of local businesses and strengthen opportunities for local supply chains to engage in the growth industries of the region. Local supply chains are recognised by the UK Government as a means of delivering ‘clean growth’ (UK Industrial Strategy) as they contribute to the Strategy’s mission to halve energy use in new buildings, partly by facilitation of local supply chains. The Science and Technology sector is the engine of the Cambridge Phenomenon that has driven the economy and it will remain an important part of the local economy and job market. Alongside, it is important to have all types of commercial space to provide for a wide range of job opportunities and to serve Greater Cambridge at close quarters to not overly rely on long-distance travel to service the area with goods and services. Cambridge lacks a distribution hub where goods are consolidated into loads for last mile (5 mile) delivery, thereby reducing the volume of HGVs moving in and through the city and reducing air pollution. Sites along the main distribution arteries, such as the A14, should be considered to avoid local HGV diversion and disruption to local communities. Delivering first-mile-last-mile connections across the Arc is a strategic priority of the Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Industrial Strategy 2019 and recognised in CPIER: “improving the “last mile” – the ability to move around within the city of Cambridge – is of a higher immediate priority than [these] inter-city links, as their effectiveness will be severely blunted without this” CPIER p80. All new employment space should be located and built to maximise the health and wellbeing of employees and visitors. Healthy buildings in locations that reduce commute times, improves the sleep and wellbeing of its occupants, contributing significantly to their productivity. Improving productivity is a primary route through which the Greater Cambridgeshire economic expansion objectives of doubling GVA and inclusive growth will be achieved. “If workers can be more productive, they can bring home more take home pay, which will flow into the local economy. And they will be able to enjoy a higher standard of life. It is this, before anything else, which needs to be looked at to create an inclusive economic future.” CPIER p38 Summary There is, and will continue to be, a need for a wide variety of space by location, size, function and price needs to be available to support the growth of the local and regional economy, offering choice to meet an occupier’s individual needs: Summary of Comments: Please see summary above.

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Form ID: 49787
Respondent: Thakeham Homes Ltd

Thakeham would support policies within the GCLP which emphasizes the national importance and the strength of Cambridge’s Science and Technology sector. The GCLP must not seek to dilute or work against the promotion of start-ups and existing businesses. The GCLP will need to allow a degree of flexibility within the key employment policies in order to allow for the changing circumstances of the market which move much faster than planning policy. This flexibility is required to allow Cambridge to move forward on it’s leading edge and not to come up against policy barriers.

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Form ID: 49810
Respondent: Lolworth Developments Limited
Agent: Bidwells

Lolworth Developments Ltd (LDL) has submitted a 100ha employment site proposal to the 'Call for Sites' consultation in March 2019. LDL has submitted further supporting evidence as to why the site is the best location to serve the area and the 'final mile' into Cambridge. See Strategic Case Report and Vision Document submitted under Q2. There is, and will continue to be, a need for a wide variety of space by location, size, function and price needs to be available to support the growth of the local and regional economy, offering choice to meet an occupier’s individual needs. There is an acute shortage in the area. “The requirements for physical space, like finance, have stages. What a business needs in its start-up phase is different to its needs as it matures and grows. It is vital, if an innovation ecosystem is to be effective for there to be variety and availability at every stage". More provision is needed. Flexible commercial space in urban and rural areas to support growth of local businesses and strengthen opportunities for local supply chains to engage in the growth industries of the region. Local supply chains are recognised by the UK Government as a means of delivering ‘clean growth’ (UK Industrial Strategy) as they contribute to the Strategy’s mission to halve energy use in new buildings, partly by facilitation of local supply chains. The Science and Technology sector is the engine of the Cambridge Phenomenon that has driven the economy and it will remain an important part of the local economy and job market. Alongside, it is important to have all types of commercial space to provide for a wide range of job opportunities and to serve Greater Cambridge at close quarters to not overly rely on long-distance travel to service the area with goods and services. Cambridge lacks a distribution hub where goods are consolidated into loads for last mile (5 mile) delivery, thereby reducing the volume of HGVs moving in and through the city and reducing air pollution. Sites along the main distribution arteries, such as the A14, should be considered to avoid local HGV diversion and disruption to local communities. Delivering first-mile-last-mile connections across the Arc is a strategic priority of the Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Industrial Strategy 2019 and recognised in CPIER: “improving the “last mile” – the ability to move around within the city of Cambridge – is of a higher immediate priority than [these] inter-city links, as their effectiveness will be severely blunted without this” CPIER p80. All new employment space should be located and built to maximise the health and wellbeing of employees and visitors. Healthy buildings in locations that reduce commute times, improves the sleep and wellbeing of its occupants, contributing significantly to their productivity. Improving productivity is a primary route through which the Greater Cambridgeshire economic expansion objectives of doubling GVA and inclusive growth will be achieved. “If workers can be more productive, they can bring home more take home pay, which will flow into the local economy. And they will be able to enjoy a higher standard of life. It is this, before anything else, which needs to be looked at to create an inclusive economic future.” CPIER p38 Summary There is, and will continue to be, a need for a wide variety of space by location, size, function and price needs to be available to support the growth of the local and regional economy, offering choice to meet an occupier’s individual needs: Summary of Comments: Please see summary above

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Form ID: 49885
Respondent: Cambourne Town Council

Existing centres of excellence will continue to attract similar and complementary businesses, so provision for them is needed. Developing trends need evaluating to meet demand. Small, affordable start-up units for lower skilled businesses. They need to be affordable, without long initial leases or onerous conditions to enable new initiatives to get past the idea stage.

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Form ID: 49980
Respondent: Newlands Developments
Agent: Turley

4.68 The Market Assessment Report prepared by Bidwells and Employment Land Needs Report prepared by Turley Economics and the (Appendices 3 and 4) inform and support the promotion of the site and masterplan which aims to provide a mixture of floorspace types to accommodate market demand and attract a diverse range of employers, especially in Research and Development supply chain and manufacturing sectors given A14 linkage between Felixstowe to the Midlands. 4.69 This proposed provision is borne out from national and regional evidence highlighted in the aforementioned assessments suggesting that provision of suitable Specification A floorspace at the larger size required to accommodate demand for industrial and warehousing/logistics operators has fallen to just 40,000 sq. m. 4.70 For the Cambridge region (i.e. within a 15 mile radius) there is only circa 7,900 sq. m of available Specification A new build space. 4.71 Alongside this, vacancy rates have been falling consistently over the past decade from highs of over 20% to the current national average of 6.65%. 4.72 Moreover and at local level, there is only 12 months of supply of adequate floorspace at current levels. 4.73 Given the shortage, occupiers are increasingly seeking build-to-suit units, with major international and national operators actively seeking locational bases within the Cambridge region. These include DHL, Amazon, Hotel Chocolate, Wincanton and Hermes to name a few. 4.74 Moreover, it is important to note the importance of providing suitable space for existing businesses in the area that may be looking to expand and grow. As highlighted above, there is little supply of new build floor space for them to do so. The provision of a purpose built cluster at the Brickyard Farm site will assist in accommodate these requirements.

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Form ID: 50079
Respondent: Marshall Group Properties
Agent: Quod

Marshall's vision for the site is to create a new cultural, living and working Cambridge quarter which combines the highest standards of modern living and working. A key part of this will be a research anchor, which will be integrated with homes, retail, cafes and restaurants and sporting facilities, in order to provide the next expansion area for Cambridge's life sciences and learning institutions. Cambridge East would be ideally scaled and located to provide for the expansion of the University of Cambridge.

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Form ID: 50148
Respondent: Trinity College
Agent: Bidwells

6.5 A wide variety of business and industrial space is most needed in Greater Cambridge, in terms of location, size, function and price, in order to support the growth of the economy, offering choice to meet an occupier’s individual needs: “The requirements for physical space, like finance, have stages. What a business needs in its start-up phase is different to its needs as it matures and grows. It is vital, if an innovation ecosystem is to be effective for there to be variety and availability at every stage1. 6.6 Flexible commercial space in urban and rural areas supports the growth of local business and strengthens opportunities for local supply chains to engage in the growth industries of the region. Local supply chains are recognised by the UK Government as a means of delivering ‘clean growth’ (UK Industrial Strategy) as they contribute to the Strategy’s mission to halve energy use in new buildings, partly by facilitation of local supply chains. 1 Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Industrial Strategy 2019 p 41 6.7 The Science and Technology sector is the engine of the Cambridge Phenomenon that has driven the economy and it will remain an important part of the local economy and job market. Alongside, it is important to have all types of commercial space to provide for a wide range of job opportunities and to serve Greater Cambridge at close quarters to not overly rely on longdistance travel to service the area with goods and services. Further prime office floorspace in high quality developments is also needed. 6.8 All new employment space should be located and built to maximise the health and wellbeing of employees and visitors. Healthy buildings in locations that reduce commute times and improve the sleep and wellbeing of its occupants contribute significantly to their productivity. Improving productivity is a primary route through which the Greater Cambridgeshire economic expansion objectives of doubling GVA and inclusive growth will be achieved. “If workers can be more productive, they can bring home more take home pay, which will flow into the local economy. And they will be able to enjoy a higher standard of life. It is this, before anything else, which needs to be looked at to create an inclusive economic future.” CPIER p38

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Form ID: 50186
Respondent: Campaign to Protect Rural England (CPRE)

Within the context of 24: • Small to medium office and manufacturing/engineering/laboratory units. • Serviced and un-serviced offices. • Mix suitable employment space with housing more organically to encourage local working.

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Form ID: 50269
Respondent: Brookgate Property and Aviva Investors
Agent: Bidwells

5.4 A wide variety of business and industrial space is most needed in Greater Cambridge, in terms of location, size, function and price, in order to support the growth of the economy, offering choice to meet an occupier’s individual needs: “The requirements for physical space, like finance, have stages. What a business needs in its start-up phase is different to its needs as it matures and grows. It is vital, if an innovation ecosystem is to be effective for there to be variety and availability at every stage1. 5.5 Flexible commercial space in urban and rural areas supports the growth of local business and strengthens opportunities for local supply chains to engage in the growth industries of the region. Local supply chains are recognised by the UK Government as a means of delivering ‘clean growth’ (UK Industrial Strategy) as they contribute to the Strategy’s mission to halve energy use in new buildings, partly by facilitation of local supply chains. 5.6 The Science and Technology sector is the engine of the Cambridge Phenomenon that has driven the economy and it will remain an important part of the local economy and job market. Alongside, it is important to have all types of commercial space to provide for a wide range of job opportunities and to serve Greater Cambridge at close quarters to not overly rely on longdistance travel to service the area with goods and services. Further prime office floorspace in high quality developments is also needed to consolidate and expand the world class facilities which have recently put CB1 on the international property investment map. 5.7 All new employment space should be located and built to maximise the health and wellbeing of employees and visitors. Healthy buildings in locations that reduce commute times and improve the sleep and wellbeing of its occupants contribute significantly to their productivity. Improving productivity is a primary route through which the Greater Cambridgeshire economic expansion objectives of doubling GVA and inclusive growth will be achieved. “If workers can be more productive, they can bring home more take home pay, which will flow into the local economy. And they will be able to enjoy a higher standard of life. It is this, before anything else, which needs to be looked at to create an inclusive economic future.” CPIER p38 1 Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Industrial Strategy 2019 p 41

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Form ID: 50352
Respondent: Brookgate
Agent: Bidwells

5.4 A wide variety of business and industrial space is most needed in Greater Cambridge, in terms of location, size, function and price, in order to support the growth of the economy, offering choice to meet an occupier’s individual needs: “The requirements for physical space, like finance, have stages. What a business needs in its start-up phase is different to its needs as it matures and grows. It is vital, if an innovation ecosystem is to be effective for there to be variety and availability at every stage1. 5.5 Flexible commercial space in urban supports the growth of local business and strengthens opportunities for local supply chains to engage in the growth industries of the region. Local supply chains are recognised by the UK Government as a means of delivering ‘clean growth’ (UK Industrial Strategy) as they contribute to the Strategy’s mission to halve energy use in new buildings, partly by facilitation of local supply chains. 5.6 The Science and Technology sector is the engine of the Cambridge Phenomenon that has driven the economy and it will remain an important part of the local economy and job market. Alongside, it is important to have all types of commercial space to provide for a wide range of job opportunities and to serve Greater Cambridge at close quarters to not overly rely on long distance travel to service the area with goods and services. Further prime office floorspace in high quality developments is also needed to consolidate and expand the world class facilities which have recently put CB1 on the international property investment map. 1 Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Industrial Strategy 2019 p 41 5.7 All new employment space should be located and built to maximise the health and wellbeing of employees and visitors. Healthy buildings in locations that reduce commute times and improve the sleep and wellbeing of its occupants contribute significantly to their productivity. Improving productivity is a primary route through which the Greater Cambridgeshire economic expansion objectives of doubling GVA and inclusive growth will be achieved. “If workers can be more productive, they can bring home more take home pay, which will flow into the local economy. And they will be able to enjoy a higher standard of life. It is this, before anything else, which needs to be looked at to create an inclusive economic future.” CPIER p38

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Form ID: 50388
Respondent: Janus Henderson UK Property PAIF
Agent: Bidwells

5.5 A wide variety of business and industrial space is most needed in Greater Cambridge, in terms of location, size, function and price, in order to support the growth of the economy, offering choice to meet an occupier’s individual needs: “The requirements for physical space, like finance, have stages. What a business needs in its start-up phase is different to its needs as it matures and grows. It is vital, if an innovation ecosystem is to be effective for there to be variety and availability at every stage1. 5.6 Flexible commercial space in urban and rural areas supports the growth of local business and strengthens opportunities for local supply chains to engage in the growth industries of the region. Local supply chains are recognised by the UK Government as a means of delivering ‘clean growth’ (UK Industrial Strategy) as they contribute to the Strategy’s mission to halve energy use in new buildings, partly by facilitation of local supply chains. 5.7 The Science and Technology sector is the engine of the Cambridge Phenomenon that has driven the economy and it will remain an important part of the local economy and job market. 1 Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Industrial Strategy 2019 p 41 Alongside, it is important to have all types of commercial space to provide for a wide range of job opportunities and to serve Greater Cambridge at close quarters to not overly rely on longdistance travel to service the area with goods and services. Further prime office floorspace in high quality developments is also needed. 5.8 All new employment space should be located and built to maximise the health and wellbeing of employees and visitors. Healthy buildings in locations that reduce commute times and improve the sleep and wellbeing of its occupants contribute significantly to their productivity. Improving productivity is a primary route through which the Greater Cambridgeshire economic expansion objectives of doubling GVA and inclusive growth will be achieved. “If workers can be more productive, they can bring home more take home pay, which will flow into the local economy. And they will be able to enjoy a higher standard of life. It is this, before anything else, which needs to be looked at to create an inclusive economic future.” CPIER p38

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Form ID: 50567
Respondent: Cambridge University Health Partners
Agent: Cambridge University Health Partners

The Local Plan should be coordinated with and support the delivery of the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Local Industrial Strategy (CPLIS). Planning for the long-term success of the life sciences sector is particularly important given the rapid take-up of land at Cambridge Biomedical Campus (CBC). The Local Plan should make provision for future life science development to 2040 and beyond. Successful innovation ecosystems are dependent upon variety and availability of space at every stage. CPLIS notes that Greater Cambridge could benefit from more start up and particularly scale up space, where innovation can be developed in close proximity to clinical service and academic expertise. We note that the Combined Authority and Greater Cambridge Partnership are working to support this, which is welcomed, and the Local Plan should support this process. A CBC Strategy Group with representation from all campus organisations has agreed to develop a Vision 2050 for the CBC. Subject to ratification by the CBC Strategy Group, this will be shared with the Greater Cambridge Planning Service by summer 2020 to define the extent, scale and location of development proposed throughout the timescale of the next Local Plan, and the anticipated number of jobs to be supported by the CBC by 2050. CUHP is committed to working with the Greater Cambridge Planning Service to develop an appropriate policy framework to guide the future development of the CBC.

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Form ID: 50600
Respondent: NW Bio and its UK subsidary Aracaris Capital Ltd
Agent: Carter Jonas

The Cambridge area is world-renown for its contribution to science, particularly life sciences. There has been an explosion in recent years in research on Advanced Therapies, including cellular and gene therapies, in part because the UK government has identified these types of Advanced Therapies – and the research and advanced manufacturing that produces them – as a national priority. However, there are little or no facilities in the Cambridge area for technology development / process development, which are responsible for turning this research into usable therapies. Additionally, there are insufficient manufacturing facilities for making clinical grade products that can be used for patients. These facilities are, therefore, among the most needed types of business and industrial space in the area and bring with them large numbers of high-value jobs for a wide range of skill levels. Advanced Therapies and personalized medicines have grown at a staggering rate in recent years. During the 1-year span from 2018-2019 alone, the number of Advanced Therapy clinical trials ongoing in the UK increased 37%, according to a report produced by the UK BioIndustry Association and Alliance for Regenerative Medicine. These “next-generation” medicinal advancements are changing the treatment paradigm for patients. In many types of cancer, for example, rather than rely on status quo chemotherapies – which are often toxic, and/or ineffective – to treat symptoms, new capabilities unlocked by cellular and gene therapies now exist that help identify underlying disease causes, alter the course of disease progression, and even provide cures for patients. Patients require new-and-improved therapies for a host of diseases, but neither companies nor academic institutions have sufficient manufacturing capacity to meet demand for these highly specialised and labour-intensive products. Licensed advanced manufacturing facilities in the UK responded to a 2018 survey conducted by the Cell & Gene Therapy Catapult, and national average booked capacity for “cleanroom” manufacturing suites was reported at 81%, with 80% utility regularly recognized as “full” capacity. There simply isn’t enough space to manufacture these medicines. To accommodate this growth need, sector employment has outstripped expectations, doubling over the last year, and a 2019 Skills Demand Report (also from the Catapult) projects that headcount will again double over the next 5 years. Cellular and gene therapies are driving the next wave of medical innovation. The advanced manufacturing facilities capable of generating these treatments for patients, however, are in short supply – certainly in the UK, and also worldwide – and continued industry expansion is necessary so that UK patients retain their access to the best available medical treatments. The moment our systems no longer embrace medical innovation coincides with patients being forced to look beyond our borders for the latest treatments, which is a scenario we can and should avoid.

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Form ID: 50627
Respondent: PX Farms Ltd
Agent: Bidwells

5.2.1 A wide variety of space by location, size, function and price needs to be available to support the growth of the economy, offering choice to meet an occupier’s individual needs: “The requirements for physical space, like finance, have stages. What a business needs in its start-up phase is different to its needs as it matures and grows. It is vital, if an innovation ecosystem is to be effective for there to be variety and availability at every stage1. 5.2.2 Flexible commercial space in urban and rural areas to support growth of local businesses and strengthen opportunities for local supply chains to engage in the growth industries of the region. Local supply chains are recognised by the UK Government as a means of delivering ‘clean growth’ (UK Industrial Strategy) as they contribute to the Strategy’s mission to halve energy use in new buildings, partly by facilitation of local supply chains. 5.2.3 The Science and Technology sector is the engine of the Cambridge Phenomenon that has driven the economy and it will remain an important part of the local economy and job market. 5.2.4 Notwithstanding this, alongside it is vitally important to have all types of commercial space to provide for a wide range of job opportunities and to serve Greater Cambridge at close quarters to not overly rely on long-distance travel to service the area with goods and services. 5.2.5 Cambridge lacks a distribution hub where goods are consolidated into loads for last mile (5 mile) delivery, thereby reducing the volume of HGVs moving in and through the city and reducing air pollution. Sites along the main distribution arteries, such as the A14 and A428, should be considered to avoid local HGV diversion and disruption to local communities. Delivering firstmile-last-mile connections across the Arc is a strategic priority of the Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Industrial Strategy 2019 and recognised in CPIER: “improving the “last mile” – the ability to move around within the city of Cambridge – is of a higher immediate priority than [these] inter-city links, as their effectiveness will be severely blunted without this” CPIER p80. 5.2.6 New communities and urban extensions require flexible space that can be used by local people as need arises for local business growth, provide affordable and temporary space for start-ups and to physically support homeworkers. 5.2.7 All new employment space should be located and built to maximise the health and wellbeing of employees and visitors. Healthy buildings in locations that reduce commute times, improves the sleep and wellbeing of its occupants, contributing significantly to their productivity. Improving productivity is a primary route through which the Greater Cambridgeshire economic expansion objectives of doubling GVA and inclusive growth will be achieved. “If workers can be more productive, they can bring home more take home pay, which will flow into the local economy. And they will be able to enjoy a higher standard of life. It is this, before anything else, which needs to be looked at to create an inclusive economic future.” CPIER p38 1 Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Industrial Strategy 2019 p 41

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Form ID: 50756
Respondent: Trinity College
Agent: Bidwells

5.4 A wide variety of business and industrial space is most needed in Greater Cambridge, in terms of location, size, function and price, in order to support the growth of the economy, offering choice to meet an occupier’s individual needs: “The requirements for physical space, like finance, have stages. What a business needs in its start-up phase is different to its needs as it matures and grows. It is vital, if an innovation ecosystem is to be effective for there to be variety and availability at every stage1. 5.5 Flexible commercial space in urban and rural areas supports the growth of local business and strengthens opportunities for local supply chains to engage in the growth industries of the region. Local supply chains are recognised by the UK Government as a means of delivering ‘clean growth’ (UK Industrial Strategy) as they contribute to the Strategy’s mission to halve energy use in new buildings, partly by facilitation of local supply chains. 5.6 The Science and Technology sector is the engine of the Cambridge Phenomenon that has driven the economy and it will remain an important part of the local economy and job market. Alongside, it is important to have all types of commercial space to provide for a wide range of job opportunities and to serve Greater Cambridge at close quarters to not overly rely on long distance travel to service the area with goods and services. Further prime office floorspace in high quality developments is also needed to consolidate and expand the world class facilities which have recently put CB1 on the international property investment map. 1 Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Industrial Strategy 2019 p 41 5.7 All new employment space should be located and built to maximise the health and wellbeing of employees and visitors. Healthy buildings in locations that reduce commute times and improve the sleep and wellbeing of its occupants contribute significantly to their productivity. Improving productivity is a primary route through which the Greater Cambridgeshire economic expansion objectives of doubling GVA and inclusive growth will be achieved. “If workers can be more productive, they can bring home more take home pay, which will flow into the local economy. And they will be able to enjoy a higher standard of life. It is this, before anything else, which needs to be looked at to create an inclusive economic future.” CPIER p38

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Form ID: 50918
Respondent: The Landowners
Agent: Miss Simone Skinner

4.37 The nature of employment space varies across the area and it is important to ensure that a range is available to ensure a wide variety of businesses have the opportunity to flourish in the area including start up and small businesses, and businesses to extend. This would support a prosperous rural economy.

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Form ID: 50970
Respondent: The Landowners
Agent: Miss Simone Skinner

4.36 The nature of employment space varies across the area and it is important to ensure that a range is available to ensure a wide variety of businesses have the opportunity to flourish in the area including start up and small businesses, and businesses to extend. This would support a prosperous rural economy.

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Form ID: 51000
Respondent: SmithsonHill
Agent: Terence O'Rourke

It is important that there is both sufficient and the right type of business space to meet the needs of those who want to locate in the area. Currently, there is insufficient business space to meet the needs of the AgriTech sector and therefore the plan should make provision of land in a suitable location (e.g. Hinxton) to meet this deficit. Greater Cambridge has demonstrated the effectiveness of the ‘clustering’ phenomenon having three distinct and established clusters: the northern IT cluster; the central A.I. cluster and the southern life sciences cluster. The objective behind clustering is the collaboration of like-minded individuals and businesses for their mutual benefit, breaking down the traditional 9-5 ‘silo’ work place. Clusters typically refer to a collection of parks or small developments in close proximity that contain multiple occupiers carrying out similar functions. They often expand around a specific knowledge hub such as a hospital or university. The benefits have been recognised by the R&D sphere with occupiers now typically seeking occupation within close proximity with their peers. Developers have responded by delivering sector specific parks within a recognised cluster which aim to attract and retain such occupiers by providing large and flexible floor plates, ‘incubator’ and ‘follow-on’ space, staff amenities, the hosting of park activities and transport / commuter provision. Greater Cambridge’s southern cluster, contains a number of successful examples of how clustering is much more than just a theory (Granta Park, Chesterford Research Park, the BioMedical Campus and the soon to be expanded Wellcome Genome Campus). These parks are a fundamental component to the globally recognised growth and success of the Life Science and Bio Tech sectors associated with Greater Cambridge. Currently, there is no park of this type for the AgriTech sector in the UK, however, there is a clear need if the objectives set out in regional and national policy documents are to be met. Policy documents that demonstrate the need for local planning authorities to support the AgriTech sector in plan making and decision taking include: • UK Strategy for Agricultural Technologies (2013) • Industrial Strategy White Paper (November 2017) • Technology and Innovation Futures 2017 • East of England Science and Innovation Audit (September 2017) – which refers to the proposal as a ‘major development in the pipeline’ • Health and Harmony: the future of food, farming and the environment in a Green Brexit (February 2018) • Initiatives to adapt to the effects of climate change and contribute towards the government’s commitment to the Paris Agreement • The Clean Growth Strategy (October 2017) • The UK Bio-economy Strategy (2018) • Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Independent Economic Review (2018) • Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Local Industrial Strategy (2019) On page 53 of the Greater Cambridge Local Plan – The First Conversation document states that the councils want to deliver the priorities set out within the Local Industrial Strategy, and therefore, it is imperative that the Local Plan acts to deliver these priorities and plans accordingly. Allocating the site at Hinxton for the proposed AgriTech park would be an appropriate step towards recognising and meeting these clear strategic priorities. Section 4.5.3 of the consultation document outlines that the new plan needs to consider: • “Demand for ‘start-up’, incubator, and grow-on space as a feature of Greater Cambridge’s economy is a high rate of ‘Business churn’, with large numbers of firms starting up each year. • The increasing popularity of flexible workspace and co-working hubs, providing shared facilities. • Providing for a wide range of employment opportunities. • How new business space can adapt to fast-changing working practices which will continue to evolve over time. • Demand for specialist space, such as laboratories.” We fully support these objectives which must be given considerable weight in establishing the future vision for economic growth in Greater Cambridge. A new park dedicated solely to AgriTech will meet the needs of all of the above for the AgriTech sector in the same way that the expanded Wellcome Genome Campus will meet the needs of the lifesciences. Therefore, it is considered vital that the new local plan not only recognises the importance of the AgriTech sector to Greater Cambridge, the region and the UK, but also plans proactively and positively for the development of a dedicated AgriTech focussed technology park. Not to do so would result in a Local Plan that fails to respect or deliver upon planning policy and the national and regional industrial strategies.

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Form ID: 51070
Respondent: Ely Diocesan Board of Finanace (EDBF)
Agent: Carter Jonas

Paragraph 82 of the NPPF states that planning policies and decisions should recognise and address the specific locational requirements of different business sectors. This includes making provision for clusters or networks of knowledge and data-driven, creative or high technology industries. The Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Independent Economic Review (CPIER) identified the national importance of knowledge intensive businesses located in the Greater Cambridge area. Therefore, it is requested that sufficient land and business space should be identified in the emerging GCLP to meet the ongoing needs and growth of knowledge intensive businesses in the Greater Cambridge area. EDBF is promoting land off Fulbourn Old Drift in Fulbourn (located adjacent to Capital Park) and land at Milton Park & Ride for employment development for Class B1 office and research and development uses. As set out in the call for sites submission, there are no constraints to development at this site. The allocation of these sites would meet the needs of knowledge intensive businesses within an established location for these uses.

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Form ID: 51159
Respondent: First Base
Agent: Bidwells

5.4 A wide variety of business and industrial space is most needed in Greater Cambridge, in terms of location, size, function and price, in order to support the growth of the economy, offering choice to meet an occupier’s individual needs: “The requirements for physical space, like finance, have stages. What a business needs in its start-up phase is different to its needs as it matures and grows. It is vital, if an innovation ecosystem is to be effective for there to be variety and availability at every stage*. 5.5 Flexible commercial space in urban and rural areas supports the growth of local business and strengthens opportunities for local supply chains to engage in the growth industries of the region. Local supply chains are recognised by the UK Government as a means of delivering ‘clean growth’ (UK Industrial Strategy) as they contribute to the Strategy’s mission to halve energy use in new buildings, partly by facilitation of local supply chains. 5.6 The Science and Technology sector is the engine of the Cambridge Phenomenon that has driven the economy and it will remain an important part of the local economy and job market. Alongside, it is important to have all types of commercial space to provide for a wide range of job opportunities and to serve Greater Cambridge at close quarters to not overly rely on longdistance travel to service the area with goods and services. Further prime office floorspace in high quality developments is also needed to consolidate and expand the world class facilities which have recently put CB1 on the international property investment map. 5.7 All new employment space should be located and built to maximise the health and wellbeing of employees and visitors. Healthy buildings in locations that reduce commute times and improve the sleep and wellbeing of its occupants contribute significantly to their productivity. Improving productivity is a primary route through which the Greater Cambridgeshire economic expansion objectives of doubling GVA and inclusive growth will be achieved. “If workers can be more productive, they can bring home more take home pay, which will flow into the local economy. And they will be able to enjoy a higher standard of life. It is this, before anything else, which needs to be looked at to create an inclusive economic future.” CPIER p38 *Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Industrial Strategy 2019 p 41

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Form ID: 51212
Respondent: Varrier-Jones Foundation
Agent: Bidwells

5.5 A wide variety of business and industrial space is most needed in Greater Cambridge, in terms of location, size, function and price, in order to support the growth of the economy, offering choice to meet an occupier’s individual needs: “The requirements for physical space, like finance, have stages. What a business needs in its start-up phase is different to its needs as it matures and grows. It is vital, if an innovation ecosystem is to be effective for there to be variety and availability at every stage1. 5.6 Flexible commercial space in urban and rural areas supports the growth of local business and strengthens opportunities for local supply chains to engage in the growth industries of the region. 1 Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Industrial Strategy 2019 p 41 Local supply chains are recognised by the UK Government as a means of delivering ‘clean growth’ (UK Industrial Strategy) as they contribute to the Strategy’s mission to halve energy use in new buildings, partly by facilitation of local supply chains. 5.7 The Science and Technology sector is the engine of the Cambridge Phenomenon that has driven the economy and it will remain an important part of the local economy and job market. Alongside, it is important to have all types of commercial space to provide for a wide range of job opportunities and to serve Greater Cambridge at close quarters to not overly rely on longdistance travel to service the area with goods and services. 5.8 All new employment space should be located and built to maximise the health and wellbeing of employees and visitors. Healthy buildings in locations that reduce commute times and improve the sleep and wellbeing of its occupants contribute significantly to their productivity. Improving productivity is a primary route through which the Greater Cambridgeshire economic expansion objectives of doubling GVA and inclusive growth will be achieved. “If workers can be more productive, they can bring home more take home pay, which will flow into the local economy. And they will be able to enjoy a higher standard of life. It is this, before anything else, which needs to be looked at to create an inclusive economic future.” CPIER p38 5.9 Papworth Business Park is currently allocated under Policy E/5 in the Local Plan for employment development uses (including Use Classes B1, B2 and B8). The business park is an attractive area for businesses with the greatest demand being for light industrial uses. The business park should continue to be protected but should also include land to the east to provide for its expansion, shown as Parcel C on the enclosed Location Plan at Appendix 1. The expansion of the business park should allow for uses B1, B2 and B8, though light industrial floorspace is considered particularly suitable in this area.

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