Question 27. How should we balance supporting our knowledge-intensive sectors, with creating a wide range of different jobs? What kind of jobs would you like to see created in the area?

Showing forms 31 to 60 of 63
Form ID: 48394
Respondent: Endurance Estates
Agent: Pegasus Group

All forms of business development should be supported through a new Local Plan. The majority of knowledge-based business will wish to be located in and around Cambridge so they can link into the university or the science park or many of the knowledge-based businesses. There are however other sustainable sites available within the plan area to deliver other types of development such as manufacturing, storage and distribution which are not particularly well-suited to a city centre or urban edge location. These sites need to be located close to major transport links and public transport but also close to houses for the work force. Endurance's site at Melbourn is the perfect example of a site suited for delivering these non-traditional types of business for Cambridgeshire. It will be capable of delivering a mix of B1, B1C and B2 uses in a sustainable location within short travelling distance to Cambridge and the M11 and A505 corridor. These types of sites on the primary transport routes should therefore be allocated to allow sufficiency choice within the plan area for a wide variety of businesses to establish themselves on a site most suited to their specific requirements.

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Form ID: 48422
Respondent: Chivers Farms Ltd
Agent: Guy Kaddish

Whilst the focus of Cambridge is the Science and Technology sector as the driving force of the economy, there is a requirement for a range of job opportunities, in urban and more rural areas. The Local Plan policy framework needs to provide for a full range of opportunities; as planned allocations and windfall employment opportunities.

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Form ID: 48531
Respondent: M Scott Properties Ltd.
Agent: Bidwells

5.10 Whilst the focus of Cambridge is the Science and Technology sector as the driving force of the economy, there is a requirement for a range of job opportunities, in urban and more rural areas. The Local Plan policy framework needs to provide for a full range of opportunities; as planned allocations and windfall employment opportunities.

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Form ID: 48604
Respondent: Chivers Farms Ltd
Agent: Bidwells

6.8 Whilst the focus of Cambridge is the Science and Technology sector as the driving force of the economy, there is a requirement for a range of job opportunities, in urban and more rural areas. The Local Plan policy framework needs to provide for a full range of opportunities; as planned allocations and windfall employment opportunities.

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Form ID: 48766
Respondent: Trinity College
Agent: Sphere25

The existing knowledge-intensive sectors have enabled economic development for the Greater Cambridgeshire area and provided the area with its international reputation. Although it is clear that a range of types of jobs are necessary to provide employment for all existing residents, local planning policy should not support the development of different jobs at the expense of knowledge intensive sectors. To encourage both economic growth and social inclusion for existing residents, the Local Plan should ensure that the knowledge-intensive sectors are supported and that residents have the greatest possible level of access to these employment opportunities, as well as the skills and opportunities to advance those skills which enable them to do so. At Cambridge Science Park North new skilled manufacturing employment opportunities would be created to support the growth of exportable high-value, low-volume science and technology product development. The impending relocation of Marshalls and uncertainty with regard to timescales, amplifies the need for investment in this type of job and employment growth within the Cambridge economy. Providing more balanced employment opportunities in skilled manufacturing in the short term, whilst providing longer term economic growth. The economic restructuring of the UK away from manufacturing towards service sectors has been ongoing over the last century. Over this time service employment has overtaken manufacturing. Within the last decades however, the decline in manufacturing has stabilised and the manufacturing which remains is highly productive and valuable to the UK economy. On average a third of manufacturing turnover is exported. For high-tech industries this rises to 59% and for mid-tech this is 42%. Just 14% of low-tech manufacturing turnover is exported17. This exportability proportion is important as it represents something that can be exported to other countries, thus assisting in reducing the UK’s balance of trade deficit. It is also an indicator of the innovative nature of these sectors, and their economic value. 17 ONS Turnover of Production Industries (See Volterra Report) The East of England is an economically important region, and Cambridge & South Cambridgeshire combined are a key employment node within this. Cambridge & South Cambridgeshire have grown at almost double the regional and national rate of growth, and around half of the growth experienced has been in professional, scientific and technical sectors. Cambridge is renowned as an area that fosters scientific and technological innovation within an institutional climate that exhibits academic excellence through expansive research and development practices. Consequently, there is already an obvious clustering of high- and mid-tech sectors in this area, and Cambridge Science Park plays a key role within this. Cambridge Science Park contains a variety of firms that specialise in various fields relating to research and development, tech-manufacturing, or a hybrid of both. On average nationally and regionally, high- and mid-tech employment combined constitute just 1011% of total employment. In Cambridge this is higher, at 15%; in South Cambridgeshire this is still higher at 33%, and when the local area around Cambridge Science Park is considered, high- and mid-tech employment make up a staggering 68% of the total employment18. This drives home the specific concentration of the type of employment supported at Cambridge Science Park. Not only is there a high prevalence of these sectors at Cambridge Science Park, it is also home to some of the more exportable subsectors within this employment sector. Cambridge Science Park has considerably higher exportability than the national average in both high-tech and mid-tech sectors. South Cambridgeshire is similarly above the national average, although less evidently than Cambridge Science Park itself. This is an indicator that even within the productive sectors of high-tech and mid-tech, Cambridge Science Park exhibits a greater concentration of highly exportable industries than the average for these already very productive sectors. This further indicates (a) that the sectors which choose to locate at Cambridge Science Park are highly valuable with high rates of exports, and (b) there is an environment at Cambridge Science Park which engenders productivity. Given the national drive towards increasing productivity, retaining innovative industries and supporting growth in industries that can increase the UK’s export base, this underlines the importance of Cambridge Science Park, not just to the Cambridge area, but also regionally and nationally. Best practise global examples reveal that the most important factors to encourage growth of tech sectors are investment, clustering, business support and physical space. Lessons from tech clusters world-wide teach us the importance of diversification and collaboration, and that the biggest challenge is enabling the required delivery of commercial space in a planned and cohesive manner that these clusters need in order to enable them to grow. 18 ONS BRES, Volterra estimates of high- and mid-tech definitions (See Volterra Report) There is already an evident clustering of both high and mid-tech sectors in Cambridge, and specifically at Cambridge Science Park. Clusters exist because firms benefit from agglomeration economies – access to skilled workers, access to markets & supply chain, and the ability to benefit from knowledge spill overs. A science park with the supporting infrastructure to maximise and facilitate such benefits offers the best opportunity for new businesses to survive, innovate and flourish. Cambridge Science Park can learn from the examples of best practise and build on the success it has already delivered through: investment by Trinity, business support linked to the existing Cambridge Science Park, access to appropriately skilled labour, (which can have the added benefit of positively impacting upon the local community). Crucially this land needs to be allocated now so that future growth is not constrained. Skilled manufacturing and development operations need a slightly different physical space offering from high-tech. they are more cost sensitive and they require more physical space per worker. South Cambridgeshire has historically met this need. Increasing however there are examples of firms being crowded out and of more and more space being lost to other uses. If sufficient land is not available for growth, the growth will be lost from South Cambridgeshire, and potentially even from the UK altogether. Volterra have undertaken a scenario-based forecasting exercise for mid-tech in this location. Three scenarios are presented within the report: – central trend based, low (constrained by space), and high growth (facilitated by a supportive cluster-based growth node). Considered over the plan period to 2031, this would equate to growth in mid-tech jobs of between 250 and 1,000 each year, or between 3,200 – 18,100 to 2031. Based on the floorspace requirements of skilled manufacturing and development occupiers, this would be expected to require c. 80,000 - 450,000 sqm of new floorspace, which equates to c. 0.9m - 4.9m sqft of floorspace. These forecasts deliberately present a very large range. There are many factors which contribute to whether the area can achieve the high growth scenario. If growth is not enabled and is instead constrained to meet the poorest of past performing levels, less space will be required. Linked to this however considerably fewer jobs opportunities are generated, along with their associated economic value and export base. If, however, growth is prioritised and planned, the past performance, speciality and evidence of strong clusters, provides confidence that significant growth could be achieved above and beyond the central scenario. Approximately 1.5m-2m sqft of new space could be delivered at Cambridge Science Park North. As the evidence demonstrates, these firms like to cluster and when they do cluster they are more productive, and thus delivering this quantum of floorspace in one location and integrated with Cambridge Science Park offers the potential to facilitate the higher scenario rate of mid-tech / skilled manufacturing and development employment growth. Cambridge Science Park could deliver c. 7,500 new jobs, contributing c. £470m in GVA each year to the economy, resulting in increased tax revenues of c. £165m. Cambridge Science Park is full, and Bidwells evidence shows that South Cambridgeshire sites are getting harder to find, as more and more get converted into residential accommodation. At the central rate of growth (continuing on past trends), Cambridge Science Park North would be full in c.6-10 years. The high growth scenario would suggest space at Cambridge Science Park North would be full in 3-5 years which would represent an ambitious and rapid programme for growth. Even in the low growth scenario we would expect the space to be full within 20 years. The approach is aimed to be both ambitious in terms of creating a world-leading mid-tech cluster but also to support the long-term growth goals of the area. Whilst there is considerable variation in the scale of potential growth in the three options, these options suggest that regardless of the growth scenario which unfolds, the space would become filled. The rate of take up and growth of the industry is highly interdependent upon available space and the condition for growth being enabled. The overarching conclusion therefore is that there is already a strong, economically productive and important mid-tech cluster in this area. There are identified physical constraints to this growth continuing in the future. Cambridge Science Park under the custodianship of Trinity College Cambridge has a track record of providing the business support and physical requirements that are needed for firms to cluster and in turn benefit from agglomeration economies. There is an opportunity to build on this and deliver much needed innovative, and exportable, economic growth which is important both to the local Cambridge economy but also more widely to the UK.

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Form ID: 48900
Respondent: Jesus College
Agent: Bidwells

5.8 The CPIER notes a missed opportunity to supply AI, science and technology and bio-medical clusters from within the region: 10.8% of supplies come from within the company’s local area (30mile radius) while 27.8% came from overseas2. Growing these local supply chains, particularly the high value ones would help disperse the economic benefits and provide a wide range of different jobs. Availability of suitable sites and premises in excellent locations outside of Cambridge is a key factor in spreading the economic growth. 5.9 The redevelopment of areas around Cambridge central station for high quality offices which offer a healthy working environment would be welcomed. The delivery of a high-quality public realm which provides both recreational space and efficient management of pedestrian and cycle through traffic is essential in these areas. Land north of Station Road would support an established sector and can provide for a range of jobs; further detail on the economic need and benefits in relation to Land to the north of Station Road is provided in the supporting Employment Needs Appraisal prepared by Bidwells LLP. 2 CPIER p54

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Form ID: 49373
Respondent: Cambridge Past, Present & Future

• CambridgePPF recognises the need for a range of different jobs but, in view of likely pressures from growth arising from knowledge-intensive sectors, we suggest that it would be inappropriate to actively encourage inward investment from sectors unrelated to the knowledge cluster through specific land allocations in the Plan. • Cambridge’s reputation is that of a fast-growing centre of high-tech so these are the sorts of employers it is likely to attract. It is therefore important that sites are allocated for jobs that support knowledge-intensive sectors and their associated services. Because of the high rental costs within the City, it is likely that employment opportunities in other sectors, like construction or warehousing, will be located outside the City, preferably this should be in one of the new settlements where the necessary services and infrastructure can be provided or in existing but under-used science and business parks. • We are concerned about the proliferation of science/business parks dotted around the rural fringes of Cambridge. Collectively they are having a significant impact on travel patterns (exacerbated because some of them are poorly located for public transport or cycling) and the previously rural character of the area.

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Form ID: 49541
Respondent: Histon & Impington Parish Council

SCDC said a couple of years ago that a boy leaving school with few qualifications in this area has a lower life chance than a similar boy in Newcastle. The Plan MUST address this if it is to be on behalf of the existing population. At the same time the high-end requiring businesses need to be encouraged for the prosperity of the area. As ever, balance. Option of manufacturing offers wider choice for school leavers who are not going into high tech. More manufacturing would also create jobs. National ITB like solution can be supported by local initiatives. Cluster small groups of teams from the same company or even people from different organisations working together locally providing knowledge transfer and knowledge sharing of methodologies such as Agile/Lean. Offices to be served by Coaches and Subject Matter experts partnering together to share experiences and mentoring staff, encouraging them to embrace change and learning. As South Cambridge District Council has thriving science and business parks increasing expertise and knowledge in these fields could make this area a hub for that expertise. Every organisation has a community arm that encourages people to know and work in their community. By working in this way locally we can improve Net Zero Carbon and improve our communities and increase social inclusion

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Form ID: 49745
Respondent: Martin Grant Homes Ltd & Harcourt Developments Ltd
Agent: Savills

MGH will await the further evidence base and technical studies that are to be provided as part of the Local Plan consultation process. Research to date in the CPIER and elsewhere* shows that there is a very large demand for employment in the area and a great opportunity for Greater Cambridge to diversify the range of employment offered in order to deliver a robust economy that is beneficial to all elements of society not just those in a particular location or employed in a specific sector. *Cambridge, A city state of mind, Savills, 2018 and The Oxford-Cambridge Innovation Arc, Savills, 2019

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Form ID: 49763
Respondent: Lolworth Developments Limited
Agent: Bidwells

Lolworth Developments Ltd (LDL) has submitted a 100ha employment site proposal to the 'Call for Sites' consultation in March 2019. LDL has submitted further supporting evidence as to why the site is the best location to serve the area and the 'final mile' into Cambridge. See Strategic Case Report and Vision Document submitted under Q2. Whilst the focus of Cambridge is the Science and Technology sector as the driving force of the economy, there is a requirement for a range of job opportunities, in urban and more rural areas. The Local Plan policy framework needs to provide for a full range of opportunities; as planned allocations and windfall employment opportunities. The CPIER notes a missed opportunity to supply AI, science and technology and bio-medical clusters from within the region: 10.8% of supplies come from within the company’s local area (30mile radius) while 27.8% came from overseas . Growing these local supply chains, particularly the high value ones, would help disperse the economic benefits and provide a wide range of different jobs. Availability of suitable sites and premises in excellent locations outside of Cambridge is a key factor in spreading the economic growth. Other commercial sectors including logistics (storage and distribution use) will be important in providing the necessary balance in offering different types of employment opportunity. Over the plan period, the GCLP will need a mix of employment sites in scale and offer to cater for employment needs, to provide flexibility for the level of skills available. Large sites for storage and distribution will be a necessity given the changes in the retail sector as internet shopping popularity increases. The Bar Hill site will be key to providing for this sector for the supply chain and which will balance with the science and tech employment requirements based around the science park campuses. The CPIER report evidence document for the Issues and Options Consultation sets out clearly the imperative employment needs for the area. The Bar Hill site lies between Bar Hill and Northstowe which will provide a local source from which people have the opportunity to work at the Bar Hill site. It should be made clear that the Bar Hill proposal will not compete with the employment offer in Northstowe New settlement. Summary Lolworth Developments Ltd's (LDL) 100 ha employment site proposal for storage and distribution use is ideally located close to Cambridge, on the new A14 road improvements and outside of the green belt; to serve the 'final mile' into and out of Cambridge. This proposal will importantly serve the supply chain to provide a specific job offer for the area to balance with the science and tech sector based on the Science Park campuses. Summary of Comments: Please see summary above.

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Form ID: 49814
Respondent: Lolworth Developments Limited
Agent: Bidwells

Lolworth Developments Ltd (LDL) has submitted a 100ha employment site proposal to the 'Call for Sites' consultation in March 2019. LDL has submitted further supporting evidence as to why the site is the best location to serve the area and the 'final mile' into Cambridge. See Strategic Case Report and Vision Document submitted under Q2. Whilst the focus of Cambridge is the Science and Technology sector as the driving force of the economy, there is a requirement for a range of job opportunities, in urban and more rural areas. The Local Plan policy framework needs to provide for a full range of opportunities; as planned allocations and windfall employment opportunities. The CPIER notes a missed opportunity to supply AI, science and technology and bio-medical clusters from within the region: 10.8% of supplies come from within the company’s local area (30mile radius) while 27.8% came from overseas . Growing these local supply chains, particularly the high value ones, would help disperse the economic benefits and provide a wide range of different jobs. Availability of suitable sites and premises in excellent locations outside of Cambridge is a key factor in spreading the economic growth. Other commercial sectors including logistics (storage and distribution use) will be important in providing the necessary balance in offering different types of employment opportunity. Over the plan period, the GCLP will need a mix of employment sites in scale and offer to cater for employment needs, to provide flexibility for the level of skills available. Large sites for storage and distribution will be a necessity given the changes in the retail sector as internet shopping popularity increases. The Bar Hill site will be key to providing for this sector for the supply chain and which will balance with the science and tech employment requirements based around the science park campuses. The CPIER report evidence document for the Issues and Options Consultation sets out clearly the imperative employment needs for the area. The Bar Hill site lies between Bar Hill and Northstowe which will provide a local source from which people have the opportunity to work at the Bar Hill site. It should be made clear that the Bar Hill proposal will not compete with the employment offer in Northstowe New settlement. Summary Lolworth Developments Ltd's (LDL) 100 ha employment site proposal for storage and distribution use is ideally located close to Cambridge, on the new A14 road improvements and outside of the green belt; to serve the 'final mile' into and out of Cambridge. This proposal will importantly serve the supply chain to provide a specific job offer for the area to balance with the science and tech sector based on the Science Park campuses. Summary of Comments: Please see summary above.

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Form ID: 49890
Respondent: Cambourne Town Council

It is the knowledge-intensive sectors that facilitate the growth of other jobs, the ‘golden goose’ has to thrive. Lower skilled employment opportunities. Could the established business buy local goods and services and create opportunities locally?

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Form ID: 49985
Respondent: Newlands Developments
Agent: Turley

4.77 The shortfall in floorspace for industrial and warehousing/logistics operators highlighted in Question 25 is further emphasised by the increasing strategic importance of that the Logistics sector is having on the national and regional economy. 4.78 Given this, the Local Plan should, in addition to supporting knowledge based jobs, seek to endorse the role other types of employment has on the local and wider economy, including the role such employment types can have on sustainability and housing growth. This approach is endorsed by the recently updated Planning Practice Guidance, July 2019, seeking to guide local authorities’ assessments of the need to allocate space for logistics. 4.79 In relation to the latter and the adopted and emerging Local Plan’s planned housing growth, the relationship between homes and the logistics sector represents an important consideration for all planning authorities, especially when the regional ratio to the housing requirement illustrates that circa 250,000 sq. m of additional logistics space would be need to maintain the current relationship with housing i.e. 6.1 sq. of logistics space for every home. 4.80 Whereas logistics space could be located on a regional basis, this will break the required optimisation of ‘last mile’ facilities which in turn can lead to longer travelling distances given rise to more carbon emissions (thus running counter to other aspirations of the emerging plan in terms of climate change), greater fuel and driver time costs to businesses and the reduced ability for operators to meet customer demands. 4.81 In addition and as highlighted in the employment ‘Needs’ report in Appendix 4, such employment types include logistics, which is considered an integral and essential element of the national economy and underpins the efficient operation of activity in most sectors. Logistics is a diverse sector and is not solely focused on the storage and on-ward delivery of goods. The sector supports a range of industries from manufactures to wholesalers and importers, retailers and E-commerce businesses as well as parcel carriers and third party logistics providers. 4.82 Indeed the sector’s contribution to the national economy is recognised by the National Infrastructure Commission, comprising circa 195,000 enterprises and employing over 2.5 million people, together contributing £121 billion gross added value to the UK economy. 4.83 Jobs growth nationally in the sector rose by 2.5% in 2018, overtaking other traditional drivers of the economy such as retailing, with salaries higher than the national average. 4.84 This is as a result of the sector creating a range of job types, including apprenticeships across the skills base, including warehouse operatives, administration and support, managerial, IT, customer services, sales and engineering, thus providing opportunities for a range of skill sets across the region.

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Form ID: 50081
Respondent: Marshall Group Properties
Agent: Quod

The CPIER Key Recommendation 3 suggests that "the UK Government should adopt a 'Cambridge or overseas' mentality towards knowledge intensive (KI) business in this area, recognising that in an era of internal connectivity and footloose labour, many high-value companies will need to relocate abroad if this area no longer meets their needs. Ensuring that Cambridge continues to deliver for KI businesses should be considered a nationally strategic priority." In recognition of this, early proposals for Cambridge East have included a significant level of floorspace, including floorspace dedicated to a research anchor that will align with the CPIER's priority for knowledge-intensive business in the area. The scale of the opportunity will allow for the provision of a wide mix of employment, both skilled and unskilled, across a range of sectors. Marshall would like to engage with the Councils and work collaboratively to establish what employment provision is required and can be accommodated at Cambridge East. The proposals for Cambridge East will include a significant amount of floorspace aimed at knowledge intensive businesses, but it is important to understand that these types of businesses and industries are host to a whole range of jobs across a wide skills profile. There will be high skilled professions but also a high proportion of mid-level occupation and lower skilled occupation that are needed to support these businesses. This includes roles such as resourcing and administration, technical support roles and other elementary positions. This will great employment opportunities for lower skilled workers, those without higher level education and entry level workers. These types of jobs offer the opportunity for in work training and progression and important in the context of the labour market as a whole. In addition, the jobs accommodated by the B class floorspace proposed, Cambridge East will deliver a whole range of community facilities to support the new residential population (and working population). This will include employment in education, health, community services, leisure, transport and retail. These types of uses will have a broad range of employment opportunities across the skill profile, but also across a range of sectors.

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Form ID: 50150
Respondent: Trinity College
Agent: Bidwells

6.10 Whilst the focus of Cambridge is the Science and Technology sector as the driving force of the economy, there is a requirement for a range of job opportunities, in urban and more rural areas. The Local Plan policy framework needs to provide for a full range of opportunities; as planned allocations and windfall employment opportunities. 6.11 The CPIER notes a missed opportunity to supply AI, science and technology and bio-medical clusters from within the region: 10.8% of supplies come from within the company’s local area (30mile radius) while 27.8% came from overseas2. Growing these local supply chains, particularly the high value ones would help disperse the economic benefits and provide a wide range of different jobs. Availability of suitable sites and premises in excellent locations outside of Cambridge is a key factor in spreading the economic growth. 6.12 The redevelopment of the Gas Field, Madingley Road provides an opportunity for a variety of commercial developments and the opportunity to provide for a range of jobs.

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Form ID: 50188
Respondent: Campaign to Protect Rural England (CPRE)

Knowledge-based and bio-medical industries and will need other services and industries to support them and to turn their discoveries into services and products. Therefore provision of a range of size and type of units and facilities for pilot plants as well as future production facilities may be a consideration if economic change includes more localisation again.

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Form ID: 50272
Respondent: Brookgate Property and Aviva Investors
Agent: Bidwells

5.9 Whilst the focus of Cambridge is the Science and Technology sector as the driving force of the economy, there is a requirement for a range of job opportunities, in urban and more rural areas. The Local Plan policy framework needs to provide for a full range of opportunities; as planned allocations and windfall employment opportunities. 5.10 The CPIER notes a missed opportunity to supply AI, science and technology and bio-medical clusters from within the region: 10.8% of supplies come from within the company’s local area (30mile radius) while 27.8% came from overseas2. 2 CPIER p54 Growing these local supply chains, particularly the high value ones would help disperse the economic benefits and provide a wide range of different jobs. Availability of suitable sites and premises in excellent locations outside of Cambridge is a key factor in spreading the economic growth. 5.11 The redevelopment of Kett House and 10 Station Road for a high density commercial-led development which offers a healthy working environment would be welcomed. The delivery of a high-quality public realm which provides both recreational space and efficient management of pedestrian and cycle through traffic is essential in areas around the Central Business District around the train station.

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Form ID: 50354
Respondent: Brookgate
Agent: Bidwells

5.9 Whilst the focus of Cambridge is the Science and Technology sector as the driving force of the economy, there is a requirement for a range of job opportunities, in urban and more rural areas. The Local Plan policy framework needs to provide for a full range of opportunities; as planned allocations and windfall employment opportunities. 5.10 The CPIER notes a missed opportunity to supply AI, science and technology and bio-medical clusters from within the region: 10.8% of supplies come from within the company’s local area (30mile radius) while 27.8% came from overseas2. Growing these local supply chains, particularly the high value ones would help disperse the economic benefits and provide a wide range of different jobs. Availability of suitable sites and premises in excellent locations outside of Cambridge is a key factor in spreading the economic growth. 5.11 The redevelopment of the commercial and residential for a high density properly mixed-use development which offers a healthy working environment and Build to Rent housing would be welcomed. The delivery of a high quality public realm which provides both recreational space and efficient management of pedestrian and cycle through traffic is essential in these areas. 2 CPIER p54

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Form ID: 50396
Respondent: Janus Henderson UK Property PAIF
Agent: Bidwells

5.10 Whilst the focus of Cambridge is the Science and Technology sector as the driving force of the economy, there is a requirement for a range of job opportunities, in urban and more rural areas. The Local Plan policy framework needs to provide for a full range of opportunities; as planned allocations and windfall employment opportunities. 5.11 The CPIER notes a missed opportunity to supply AI, science and technology and bio-medical clusters from within the region: 10.8% of supplies come from within the company’s local area (30mile radius) while 27.8% came from overseas2. Growing these local supply chains, particularly the high value ones would help disperse the economic benefits and provide a wide range of different jobs. Availability of suitable sites and premises in excellent locations outside of Cambridge is a key factor in spreading the economic growth. 5.12 The development of land at Capital Park provides an opportunity for a variety of commercial developments and the opportunity to provide for a range of jobs. 2 CPIER p54

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Form ID: 50569
Respondent: Cambridge University Health Partners
Agent: Cambridge University Health Partners

No response proposed.

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Form ID: 50629
Respondent: PX Farms Ltd
Agent: Bidwells

5.4.1 Whilst the focus of Cambridge is the Science and Technology sector as the driving force of the economy, there is a requirement for a range of job opportunities, in urban and more rural areas. The Local Plan policy framework needs to provide for a full range of opportunities; as planned allocations and windfall employment opportunities. 5.4.2 Availability of suitable sites and premises in excellent locations outside of Cambridge is a key factor in spreading the economic growth.

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Form ID: 50758
Respondent: Trinity College
Agent: Bidwells

5.9 The CPIER notes a missed opportunity to supply AI, science and technology and bio-medical clusters from within the region: 10.8% of supplies come from within the company’s local area (30mile radius) while 27.8% came from overseas2. Growing these local supply chains, particularly the high value ones would help disperse the economic benefits and provide a wide range of different jobs. Availability of suitable sites and premises in excellent locations outside of Cambridge is a key factor in spreading the economic growth. The redevelopment of areas around Cambridge central station for high quality offices within mixed use development which offers a healthy working environment would be welcomed. The delivery of a high quality public realm which provides both recreational space and efficient management of pedestrian and cycle through traffic is essential in these areas. 2 CPIER p54

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Form ID: 50920
Respondent: The Landowners
Agent: Miss Simone Skinner

4.39 In order to support a diverse community and healthy lifestyle it is essential to have a variety of employment opportunities across all sectors. Unless this is carried forward, residents will not perceive that there are equal opportunities across the area with a range of different skills.

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Form ID: 50972
Respondent: The Landowners
Agent: Miss Simone Skinner

4.38 In order to support a diverse community and healthy lifestyle it is essential to have a variety of employment opportunities across all sectors. Unless this is carried forward, residents will not perceive that there are equal opportunities across the area with a range of different skills.

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Form ID: 51001
Respondent: SmithsonHill
Agent: Terence O'Rourke

It is important that the plan provides for a range of jobs, including supporting the knowledge-intensive sectors that are unique to Greater Cambridge. Failing to provide for the knowledge-intensive sectors may see these important people and businesses leaving the Greater Cambridge area to locate in other parts of the UK or more likely overseas. Of particular importance is the provision of support for the AgriTech sector. Investment in AgriTech is a key focus of the national and regional industrial strategies. The Industrial Strategy (2017) for the UK is focussed on increasing productivity to deliver economic growth through priority sector investments. Agriculture was identified as one of 6 priority sectors to apply artificial intelligence (AI) (one of the four Grand Challenges) and was one of the 5 identified priority sectors to apply clean growth (another of the four Grand Challenges). The strategy also states: “We will put the UK at the forefront of the global move to high efficiency agriculture. Rising global demand for food and water is increasing the need for agriculture that produces more from less. Our new ‘Transforming food production: from farm to fork’ programme will put the UK at the forefront of advanced sustainable agriculture. Over the coming years, as we replace the Common Agricultural Policy, we will increase the incentives for investment in sustainable agriculture, helping to grow the markets for innovative technologies and techniques.” The Cambridge and Peterborough Local Industrial Strategy outlines the following: “Cambridgeshire and Peterborough’s ambition is to support further growth in pioneering research and development (‘R&D’) in plant science and precision agriculture, as part of a regional offer…Agri-tech is one of the area’s strategic growth sectors which does not yet have central agglomerations which will be a key ingredient in its future success.” The policy support for investment in AgriTech in the Greater Cambridge area is clear to see and this should therefore be addressed within the new Local Plan. By supporting the development of a dedicated AgriTech park at Hinxton there is the potential to generate 4,000 full time equivalent direct high-quality jobs for the long term with a number of additional multiplier jobs in the service sector also created. The park would also see up to 70 commercial businesses located on site, supporting the creation of new businesses and the growth of AgriTech related businesses from across the UK and overseas.

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Form ID: 51161
Respondent: First Base
Agent: Bidwells

5.9 Whilst the focus of Cambridge is the Science and Technology sector as the driving force of the economy, there is a requirement for a range of job opportunities, in urban and more rural areas. The Local Plan policy framework needs to provide for a full range of opportunities; as planned allocations and windfall employment opportunities. 5.10 The CPIER notes a missed opportunity to supply AI, science and technology and bio-medical clusters from within the region: 10.8% of supplies come from within the company’s local area (30mile radius) while 27.8% came from overseas*. Growing these local supply chains, particularly the high value ones would help disperse the economic benefits and provide a wide range of different jobs. Availability of suitable sites and premises in excellent locations outside of Cambridge is a key factor in spreading the economic growth. 5.11 The redevelopment of the Travis Perkins site for a high density mixed-use development which offers a healthy working environment and Build to Rent housing would be welcomed. The delivery of a high quality public realm which provides both recreational space and efficient management of pedestrian and cycle through traffic is essential in areas around the Central Business District around the train station. *CPIER p54

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Form ID: 51289
Respondent: Varrier-Jones Foundation
Agent: Bidwells

5.10.1 Whilst the focus of Cambridge is the Science and Technology sector as the driving force of the economy, there is a requirement for a range of job opportunities, in urban and more rural areas. The Local Plan policy framework needs to provide for a full range of opportunities; as planned allocations and windfall employment opportunities. 5.10.2 The CPIER notes a missed opportunity to supply AI, science and technology and bio-medical clusters from within the region: 10.8% of supplies come from within the company’s local area (30mile radius) while 27.8% came from overseas2. Growing these local supply chains, particularly the high value ones, would help disperse the economic benefits and provide a wide range of different jobs. Availability of suitable sites and premises in excellent locations outside of Cambridge is a key factor in spreading the economic growth. 5.11 The expansion of Papworth Business Park to the east is considered an appropriate location for B1, B2 and B8 uses, expanding on the existing site allocation under Policy E/5. The business park currently attracts a range of tenants, helping to support the local and regional economy. The site allocation of the business park under Policy E/5 should be expanded to include land to the east, shown as Parcel C on the enclosed Location Plan in order to allow for sufficient flexibility over the Local Plan period to enable development to come forward as the demand increases. Uses B1, B2 and B8 should be included in the expanded policy allocation.

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Form ID: 51594
Respondent: Cambridgeshire County Council

WITH REFERENCE TO 4.5.3 The provision of high quality education supports economic development by providing the individual with the necessary skills to take advantage of the employment opportunities available. Equally, providing the right opportunities in terms of employment can also help to meet local needs, as well as provide opportunities for valuable and varied employment from further people travelling/relocating from further afield.A balance of the two key elements above is essential in achieving great places to live, work and learn.

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Form ID: 51697
Respondent: U+I Group PLC
Agent: Carter Jonas

2.47 See response to Q.25.

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Form ID: 56282
Respondent: DB Group
Agent: Carter Jonas

The Local Plan should ensure that a variety of employment opportunities are available across the District for all members of the community. This includes protecting and enabling the growth of established and successful businesses in the District such as DB Group. DB Group operate in Bourn and undertake the following operations and processes: - Sand grading – filtering sand to provide different levels of fineness; - Production of additives used in concrete mixes – blending of powders from silo storage; -Warehousing – receipt and dispatch of goods either manufactured or purchased off site for resale. These uses, in combination, amount to B2 General Industrial use. The company currently employs 21 full time staff on site with a further 40 being primarily field based and visiting the site approximately once a week. The company’s expansion plans have the potential to create a further 16 jobs on site in the relatively near term and potentially more in the future. The company’s drive for lower carbon construction is typified by the local development of its Cemfree ultra-low embodied carbon concretes. The company employs international industry experts at its Bourn research and development laboratories, developing current and new product solutions. The Council should also be supporting innovative companies, such as DB Group, who are leaders in their field and contribute to achieving wider objectives of the Plan such as reducing our impact on the climate. DB Group has sustainability running through its core and the company understand how important it is to reduce their environmental impact in everything they do. That’s why, in 2015 they introduced Cemfree ultra-low carbon concrete which was a complete game changer for the construction industry that achieves dramatic carbon savings of up to 88% in concrete. This innovative technology was developed in-house to ensure every detail was exactly as it should be. It has since won multiple awards and continues to excite and impress the industry in equal measure. Ensuring that businesses and employment opportunities within the District are also focussed on reducing our impact on climate will be essential. The Council should be proactively working with DB Group, and companies like them, to ensure that the Council enables them to achieve their full potential in terms of innovation

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